Repairing Deck Core from Underside, Thickness of new fiberglass layup!

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by wesley Sherman, Jul 9, 2021.

  1. wesley Sherman
    Joined: Jan 2020
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    Location: New York

    wesley Sherman Junior Member

    I would like to know others thoughts that know more than me, When I removed the previous fiberglass that I cut out to get to the core, the layup had no consistent thickness. Seemed to be a bit less than 18th of an inch which surprised me. So so far I have layed up 3 layers of 1708. Watching my friend of 280lbs walk across the area I see no deflection, Taping on areas that are original, and then the ones I've done have a similar sound.
    Should I lay a couple more or is the three I've done enough. The deck width in these areas is about 12-14 inches wide.
    The balsa core is 1/4" thick if it matters.

    Below is a photo of one of the areas.
    [​IMG]

    Also, does anyone see a reason not to fillet the hull to deck joint and fiberglass it in as well? All the fiberglass layup is overlayed like bricks to not have seams to line up.

    Thank you in advance
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Wesley, I think that you are overthinking all of this.
    Your boat was massively built (relatively) in the 60's - she has not fallen apart yet, and I don't see her doing this any time soon.
    Especially as all the repair work that you are doing appears to be first class.

    I think you have answered your own question - it has coped very well for 50 odd years, so why should you want to further reinforce the hull / deck joint?
    Unless you want to do it for peace of mind, as it is all exposed now.
     
  3. wesley Sherman
    Joined: Jan 2020
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    Location: New York

    wesley Sherman Junior Member

    Thank you Bajansailor, I probably do overthink things, overbuild as well. Yes peace of mind is a good thing, and even though it has lasted this long is a great thing but I want to make sure I do things that will possibly allow it to last another 30. Trying to think ahead. My son wants it after I am done with it so, at this point of a total refit, I would like to address things that could come to event in the future.
     
  4. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Spans are all that matter.

    You can't build a 3 layer each side 1708 layup with a 1/4" balsa core and expect a 3 foot span rating. For one thing the core is too thin.

    But you tested a 250#+ man walking a 14" span, so really not more to do.

    The core thickness was a bit underdone, but if it works, don't worry.
     
  5. ART DUBOW
    Joined: Sep 2022
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    Location: Stamford, CT

    ART DUBOW New Member

     
  6. Tops
    Joined: Aug 2021
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    Location: Minnesota

    Tops Senior Member

    Very nice work. Did you wet out the fabric first? Did you do anything to hold it in place?
     
  7. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Wesley, the forum has not seen you since July last year - if this finds you, could you give us an update please on the re-fit of your lovely Alberg?
     
  8. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You cannot laminate that in place. The best way to do it is to find a shape that will support the glass and put plastic on that shape for a release and press table wetted glass up. 1708 will hold its shape somewhat, but if you try with your hands; it will usually fail.
     
  9. Tops
    Joined: Aug 2021
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    Location: Minnesota

    Tops Senior Member

    Thanks. I have a similar job to do on mine 2-3 projects into the future and the outside glassing/gelcoat/non-skid is still quite nice so I want to repair from the inside.
    I have been scheming on ideas from vacuum bagging to applying pressure with inflatable pool toys or car jacks to asking the neighbor down the road with the crane service to flip my boat over...ok probably not flipping over but fun to think about :)
    Wetting out on a table and holding in place with some sort of release film under mild pressure seems pretty practical/doable and less of a project than vacuum bagging. My core would be thicker and my unsupported spans are about the same as Wesley posted upthread.
     

  10. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Well, the trick is getting it on the spot. Once it is there; the resin and good consolidation seems to hold quite well. For work, I've done, I made/used jigs that were a hair undersized. Generally, this allowed me to get some of the laminate on and held before removing the jig. Final consolidation helped. I also got some good help from my friend Ray who died March 3, 2022.
     
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