Removing Fiberglass (new to forum)

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Flipsdream, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Thanks in advance for any replies.

    After wanting a wooden fishing boat to restore for many years, I took the plunge this weekend.

    In time I will ask your help in identifying this boat. For the present, I am content with my speculation that it might be an old Penn Yann. (I'll post pics in time)

    Before my purchase, somewhere in this forum I picked up on the notion that using fiberglass to repair/restore a strip constructed small boat was inappropriate.

    After I drove several hundred miles to pickup my new (old) boat I was disappointed to find that someone had fiberglassed the bottom of the boat.

    Can you please help me understand the pitfalls and why this was not a recommended repair and how I can recover from it and restore her to original condition?

    Before pictures I can tell you that the edges of this repair are already pulling loose and rotten wood can clearly be seen under these edges.
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Fiberglassing the bottom is not right or wrong in itself. It depends on what kind of fabric, resin, preparation, condition of wood, etc. You need someone to inspect the boat in site.
     
  3. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Thanks! Big grin, I'm sure I've already broken another cardinal sin of wooden boat restoration: We've already begun pulling the old/dead fiber off from one side only. (rule violation: patience) :0)

    Ok, so underneath there are reminants of paint, which tells me (I think) that originally she had a painted bottom. She was green, on the bottom anyway. Her strips were nailed? or screwed from the outside and either before the paint or the fiberglassing the nail/screw heads appeared to have been sealed or chaulked. There are a few patches where it would appear the resin permeated the wood/rot and those patches are still stuck and when removing them (the one or two we've pulled) wood/rot comes off with them.


    Any suggestions on what or how to deal with the stuck patches?

    Plowing ahead....... mikensherry
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Use a grinder
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Thoughts on strip plank by Paul Gartside

    http://www.gartsideboats.com/faq/more-on-strip-planking-pauls-opinion.html


    Bi axial glass cloth set in Epoxy is the standard approach and is used successfully by many builders. .

    You will have to decide on the approach you will take. Many times with an older boat the epoxy glass treatment is the only practical way to put some more years into her.
     
  6. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    First Pictures

    http://www.boatdesign.net/gallery/showgallery.php/ppuser/44980/cat/500 Thanks again for your responses. I've posted a few pictures here and I'm going to try to link them up. If I'm successful, maybe someone can tell me what they think she is, or where she came from. In the meantime, we'll be doing our homework trying to learn about the names of her parts and the method of construction. Since we pulled off the fiberglass on one side, there is the distinct heavy aroma of cedar in the air. I'm in heaven :eek:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 10, 2011
  7. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

  8. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Ok, I think I blew it on posting pics the first time. I'll try again a little later. Thanks all
     
  9. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Boat Pictures

    Now I'm really confused. When I go to look at my "Gallery" thumbnails are there but not of my pics. Maybe it just takes them a while to populate because when you click them, my pictures come up. Anyway, there she is.

    I think she is cedar plank construction, but I'm sure there is a more descriptive term to use that we haven't learned yet.

    thanks, mikensherry
     
  10. Boat Design Net Moderator
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    Boat Design Net Moderator Moderator

    Sorry for any confusion mikensherry - I saw your 6:06 post above and found 5 images in the upload queue which appeared to be waiting due to a blank description so I went ahead and submitted them through. (In general it may be more expedient to click "go advanced" and "manage attachments" and attach the images to a forum post itself - it just depends on where you want them to be viewed.) In any case, I hope the photos are showing correctly for you now at http://www.boatdesign.net/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=44980 and sorry again for the initial difficulty.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The photo show a lot of rot.
     
  12. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Yes? Is that unusual? It would appear that the fiberglass trapped moisture and contaminants which couldn't have helped.

    Regardless, if we end up building a new boat by replacing everything that's what we're committed to today. Just need to learn where to start and how to do it.

    Really appreciate you looking gonzo.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    First you need to decide what you want the finish product to be. Is this a restoration or a boat for everyday use?
     
  14. Flipsdream
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Both hopefully. Is that wrong?
     

  15. Flipsdream
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Flipsdream Junior Member

    Purpose for buying/restoring boat and others

    Hi Gonzo et al:

    I'm not sure if you got my last reply but, I'd like to restore the boat (forgive me if I'm not using the correct terminology) and use it whenever we like.

    I've got other questions after removing the fiberglass as well. I'll post them here but if I should post them elsewhere, please feel free to correct me.

    As one can see from the pictures, I believe the transom must be replaced. But, also 90% or more of the cedar strips (planking?) that terminate on the transom are rotten on the last couple of inches as well.

    It doesn't seem logical to me that one would saw off all the strips at the same point and simply glue in new sections from that point on to the transom. (Someone already made a repair sort of like that on the keel and over time it appears to have separated.)

    Can someone point me in the right direction for a "how to" properly repair these strips/planks?

    Finally (for now :eek:) ) What is the name of that strip of wood that runs from bow to stern on the side of the boat. I think it is intended to roll water back from the side of the boat?

    Thanks so much,

    mikensherry
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
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