Redesigning a steel hulled Lelievlet scout boat to wood

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Peterlpearson, Apr 22, 2011.

  1. Peterlpearson
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Peterlpearson New Member

    The steel hulled Lelievlet boat used by Dutch sea scouts is an ideal training vehicle. It is 5.6 meters in length and can be sailed sculled and rowed and holds up to 6. I moved to Brazil and recently discovered that no Brazilian sea scout groups have boats - far too poor and the rich kids do not become sea scouts. I wish to initiate a boat building project as cheaply as possible, but in wood not steel, that the local sea scouts could undertake themselves under supervision. Welding of thin steel plate would be beyond their and my capacities and professional thin plate welding of the quality required is unaffordable, if available. Further, I have been unable to trace plans for a wooden version of a Lelievlet. What planning and construction modifications would be required to change the steel construction to a stitch and glue marine ply version. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lelievlet. For example, there would need to be considerably more internal support included in the marine ply version to supply sufficient rigidity and a large increase in ballast to compensate for the greatly reduced hull weight. Any suggestions and useful comments welcome. Also any suggestions on comparable wooden alternatives welcome. I have extensive experience with wood and successfully constructed a 30ft sailing ketch (Waterwitch).
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Rather then a complex conversion process for a new build, a much better solution is a different design, one suited for the build method desired. As for internal framing and additional stiffeners, you'd need less not more on a taped seam build of similar dimensions, if it was designed properly.

    With a quick look at the dimensions of the Lelievet, it's clearly a big of a pig for a sailboat (almost 300 D/L and less then 16 SA/D). 650 kilo on a 5.6 m boat! Ouch. There are much more reasonable designs available and you'd be best advised to avail yourself of one.
     
  3. Peterlpearson
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    Peterlpearson New Member

    I agree but have been unable to locate a design with the same across the board training potential for sea scouts, and the boats are absolutely indestructible. The Lelievlet is often used for rowing competitions to build up big healthy Dutch sea scouts! Doing the same in marine ply would reduce the weight tremendously. I am not entirely fixed on the Lelievlet and am open to recommendations. But if someone could also advise me on how to make the changes from steel to ply that would not only be great but interesting.
     
  4. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The changes from steel to taped seam plywood are not easily recited here, nor a recommendation that a novice designer should attempt. This is a change that should be done professionally or at least by a student of design with some experience.

    As for what design to select from, well you're best equipped to answer this question. Your Lelievlet is about the most popular class of sailboat available. There are literally hundreds (actually thousands) of designs to choose from. Make a list of your needs, desires attributes, etc. and see how the designs stack up. Eventually, you get down to a fairly short list and then it's just a matter of which one "speaks" to you, as they'll all (the remaining few) be well suited by then.
     
  6. Peterlpearson
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    Peterlpearson New Member

    Thanks for the suggestion. The Tern seems a very pretty boat. What is the approximate construction time in man-hours?
     
  7. Peterlpearson
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    Peterlpearson New Member

    I guess it was too much to expect there to be a simple solution for a stitch and glue equivalent of a Lelievlet. I will take your advise and look further. Thank you, it is appreciated.
     

  8. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Peter,

    Construction time is something that varies considerably with the build crews skill and experience, and with the finish level.......Someone extremely finicky (fussy) can double the build hours easily, as a rule of thumb guess I would say that a crew of amateur builders is going to take at least 1000 hours to build a nicely finished Tern.......a skilled crew could build one at decent finish level in 4-500 hours.....
     
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