Redecking and replacing superstructure.

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by RT Escapade, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. RT Escapade
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Gillingham, UK

    RT Escapade Escapade owner

    Hi,

    I am taking my Robert Tucker Escapade out in a few weeks to replace the decking and superstructure as they are rotten. Does anyone have experience of this or knowledge of anyone who has done it previously either on an Escapade or similar ply boat?

    I'm after any hints or tips and things to avoid. I'm thinking of replacing the decking in 2 or 3 sheets of 1/4 inch marine ply stuck together with West Epoxy. Any advice on the final finish would be most appreciated.

    I'm also thinking of extending the house back a couple of feet and the cockpit as the stern storage is a little bit wasteful. What problems can I expect and are there any ways to mitigate them. Should I even contemplate changing the layout?

    My boat is 26 foot and I have attached a picture to help.

    Kind regards,

    Haydn.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are lots of things you can, but I'm not familiar with this particular model, though am with Tucker. He had a trend toward weird sheer lines and aft decks, which your boat shows.

    As to the deck and cabin roof, you have several avenues of pursuit in this regard. On a 26' boat, you only need a 1/2" thick cabin roof, which certainly can be 2 layers of 1/4". This solves a few problems, though does increase costs a bit (more sheets of plywood). A lot depends on the underlying structure as to how much thickness you actaully need. With closely spaced stringers and beams, you don't need much, but on the other hand, you could also eliminate the stringers and beams, with a cored structure, so it really depends on what's there and what you'd like to do.

    As far as modifications to the cabin and cockpit, I'm all for this. Make the boat what you want and hacking away at that huge aft deck, is one way to get some room. Extending the cabin aft also is a possibility. Most of this also relies on what's there and what you have to cut, replace or support once you've moved stuff.

    The nice thing about plywood boats is, you can pretty much do anything you want, fill the seams with goo and under paint, no one will have a clue what you've done. Can you provide more construction details, about the aft end of the cockpit and the cabin's structural elements?
     
  3. Nick.K
    Joined: May 2011
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    Location: Ireland

    Nick.K Senior Member

    What kind of shelter will you have to do the work in?

    My advice would be: what ever you do make sure that you have a weather tight enclosure be it a shed or a tent.
    It's amazing how the rain appears from nowhere just when you have the cover off and normally these type of projects depend on being able to use every minute of available time efficiently, if you have to put off working every time there is adverse weather it could take for ever.

    If you go back two feet, will there still be enough buoyancy in the cockpit? I had a 27ft boat with a narrow stern like yours and two people sitting at the back of the cockpit would put the cockpit sole under water.

    I am currently working on a steel hull where I redesigned the deck, it gave me huge satisfaction to see the design taking shape as I wanted

    Nick.
     
  4. RT Escapade
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Gillingham, UK

    RT Escapade Escapade owner

    Thanks for the quick replies.

    PAR - I will post a couple of interior photos and measure the distances between the stringers and beams. They are pretty sound and I don't plan to make many changes to them (unless I can't separate them from the decking).

    I have the original builders plans and will provide more details about the cabin and cockpit next week.

    Nick. K - Thanks for the advice about storage, I will be storing Ariel in a barn during the work as I am fully aware of the pain the British weather causes. I have already taken the hull back to the ply, repaired and repainted. I lost months due to the weather because I was outside. I have attached some photos of that ordeal!!!

    I will need to check about the buoyancy as I had not thought about that. A valid point. I think it will be fine though. Thanks for the support.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Moving the cockpit aft a few feet will not affect the trim all that much on this design. If she's tiller steered, you'll be sitting in the same places as previously, particularly upwind, with the option of being able to scoot aft a bit when off the wind.
     

  6. RT Escapade
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Gillingham, UK

    RT Escapade Escapade owner

    The plans for the boat.

    Sorry for the delay, these things always take ages.

    I have attached the plans which are pretty true to the boat. No major changes.

    I hope you can connect to them. I have had to put them on Flickr as they are too big for this site.

    http://www.flickr.com/x/t/0094009/photos/78820930@N02/

    Thanks again.
     
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