Recirculating Shower System(s)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by brian eiland, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Not on your Micro. You will have a black plastic bag hung on the boom with a hose snaking into the shower. If the water trickles out you get a long therapeutic shower...if it goes Whosh a short therapeutic shower.

    In the end..cold beer is the required therapy...budget extra space and recycle the cans.
     
  2. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 1,004
    Likes: 86, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 933
    Location: Hobart

    pdwiley Senior Member

    Yeah - I think I need to double the space allocated to refrigeration.

    PDW
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
    Posts: 4,862
    Likes: 115, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1180
    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Thats the real challenge on a small boat. Refer space. Beer and most important fruit and veg.

    A solar panel dedicated to powering one of those electronic Peltier effect coolers might do the trick.
     
  4. jonr
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 721
    Likes: 11, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 57
    Location: Great Lakes

    jonr Senior Member

    I'd rather take part of my shower in sea water vs recycled water.

    I don't know how much buildup seawater causes in a water heater.
     
  5. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Every now and then, a non-city-boy comes around and tells the truth ....

    Even if not stored, the pathogens we wash off are really nasty ones .... they live on humans, not other animals ....
     
  6. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

  7. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,875
    Likes: 311, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Thats right, burst my bubble !! :-(

    I was just sketching a cockpit that can have one end blocked off for a full spa - with jets mounted under the cockpit seats ......... sigh
     
  8. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 1,854
    Likes: 71, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 896
    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    I've seen some very unique water systems that can clean and purify used water and waste water all used in high up mountain cabins. A little scary drinking that water which is collected rain water originally. Very expensive systems.
    On a boat the best ideas I can come up with are large storage capicity, ability to collect rain water, a 12 volt pump that will suck up water out of a lake from 50' below the surface or from a river, a simple testing kit to see if it is safe to drink then it is safe to shower in and a lot of beer on board. No answer for salt water though no reason you cannot shower in it for a few days.
     
  9. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    All you need for sanitation of your water for a shower is getting the water to 150 degrees.

    You are not trying to drink it .... that is a different story.
     
  10. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
    Posts: 4,964
    Likes: 188, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 1903
    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Creek waters, Cistern waters, etc

    In first place where did you get the idea that I wanted to build or employ such a system as you indicated above (underlined)?? You guys are going off the deep end on me here. And I am NOT proposing to drink this shower water, in case that has entered your mind.

    With all your talk of pathogens in the water though, I did go looking briefly at what it took to 'filter' some of these guys out. I was surprised to find that many can be filtered out with much less technology than RO units.

    I found this paper which is quite involved, and I will have to look at it in more detail in the future.
    http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/42796/1/9241562552.pdf

    If water is so contaminated with pathogens how do you ever let yourself go swimming in an 'untreated' creek or bay, or ocean?...or take a bath rather than a shower?

    Wonder how all those people have survived on that rain water they catch in the Caribbean islands that sits around in cisterns??
     
  11. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    People do not defecate in their cisterns .....

    Boiling is the safest method of eliminating pathogens for a shower.

    You asked the question and you got answers.

    Just because the OBVIOUS grossed you out, is well, natural.

    And that is why I do not swim in California .... period.
     
  12. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 1,743
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2078
    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    I see nothing in either article that indicates shower water from previous showers is being stored. In fact, the system doesn't have enough capacity to do so.

    If the water is undergoing a genuine pasteurization process as indicated below, and the system only recycles water from the current shower being taken, I don't see a problem.
     
  13. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 1,805
    Likes: 139, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 304
    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    ain't someone come up with cheap, easy to use additive to kill all harmful germs in bathing water yet not make you itchy like bleach?

    Maybe a two stage system. Nuke the water with hella bleach then add a neutralizer a few minutes later?


    Anyway, I think they already got a one-time recirculator. You stand in a 1/2 barrel and use a big ladle to scoup up water and pour on your head.

    I've done this using a very large dark blue enamel pot(canning pot?)

    The dark metal also heats the water in the sun, or you could put on stove.
     
  14. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,875
    Likes: 311, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    That article also mentions pre-treatment, doing some preparation like filtration before processing.

    There was a bad outbreak reported some weeks ago, of legionella disease that killed a few people, but these are from things like cooling towers, where the water sits around, warm, for weeks on end.

    In a shower situation, you would be dealing with relatively high temperatures for a maximum of say 30 minutes, which would not be that dangerous. You would have to make sure that the 'recycling reservoir' was evacuated totally after use ( think of sharing bathwater like they had to in the old days )

    If you also introduced some filtration and straining device for the re-circulated component, it would seem that the chance of dangerous pathogens would be very remote.

    The final part of the problem is what to do with the filters. A few experienced people have mentioned the horror of maintenance and cleaning of systems. I guess this would need some study, and experimentation with salt water immersion, drying and other pathogen destroying actions.

    This is a great topic for boats, but the ramifications of a working system for very dry parts of the world are there as well.
     

  15. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
    Posts: 1,743
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2078
    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    I spent several months on a piece of property my brother owned once. He had a mobile on it, but no hot water. So every morning I heated a pot of water to boiling, then poured it into a big bucket of cold water.

    I used a plastic bowl instead of a ladle, but the idea was the same: pour water over myself to soap up and shampoo, then rinse off the same way.

    Kind of like a Japanese bath - except there were no beautiful young ladies to scrub my back, and the bucket wasn't big enough to climb into and soak after I was clean....
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.