Random Picture Thread

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by kach22i, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

  2. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    https://en.topwar.ru/113676-stim-drony.html
    'Exactly 140 years ago, on April 15, 1877, Italian professor Enrico Forlanini conducted in Milan tests of the world's first unmanned helicopter with a mechanical engine, capable of gaining altitude and stably, albeit briefly, stay in the air. Forlanini's helicopter had a coaxial design and a two-cylinder steam engine. Back in 1863, a similar model of a coaxial steam helicopter was built and tested by the Frenchman Gustave Ponton d'Amercourt, however, due to its high weight and low power density, it could not fly.
    Forlanini found a palliative solution to this problem by maximizing the ease of powerplant. His steam engine had no fuel, no fire, and the boiler was a small and very durable steel ball with water that withstand internal pressure to 10 atmospheres. When it was heated by the external burner, the water boiled and evaporated, and the opening of the valve on the tube connecting the boiler to the cylinders put the machine into action. Thanks to this solution, the Forlanini machine with a two-meter span of screws weighed just 3,5 kilograms, however, due to the rapid drop in steam pressure, the motor could work for only a few seconds, continuously losing power.
    In the most successful flight, the helicopter gained altitude 13 meters and landed 20 seconds after takeoff. Understanding that such a device could not be of practical value, and more efficient motors could not be seen on the horizon, the professor soon ceased to engage in rotary-wing machines, staked out for himself the world championship in the creation of a successfully flying helicopter. Later he became famous for the creation of high-speed boats and hydrofoil airboats, but this is another'

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    'Modern museum replica of the Forlanini helicopter. The “sharokotel”, which hangs on a thin tube, at the same time served as a load balancer, which allowed the device to remain stable, but only in calm weather.'

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    'And as a supplement - another flying machine of the steampunk era, although not with a steam one, but with an air motor. In 1878, Frenchman Pierre Castell built a helicopter with eight coaxial screws combined into two groups. He was driven by a two-cylinder engine that operated on compressed air from a ground-based compressor, with which the helicopter was connected with a long hose. The device weighed 22 kilogram, that is - it was much heavier and larger than the Forlanini model.

    On tests, the helicopter took off from the ground and rose to a height of about two meters, but in flight it almost immediately took off. The inventor did not have time to turn off the compressor, the car crashed into a stone fence and collapsed. The further fate of this device and its creator is unknown.'
     
  3. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    That is an interesting story, Prof. Turnip. Thanks.

    -Will
     
  4. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Thanks, Will - glad you enjoyed it. I thought the Forlanini machine was particularly elegant.
     
  5. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    @hoytedow Maybe time for a new pasture, ay?
     
  6. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    I love the heated steam ball concept. A long time ago, I played around, conceptually, with a jetpack idea that used a high capacity compressor instead of a jet or rocket engine. I thought I'd made up the idea of a high-speed compressor using a centrifuge fan, but it's not new at all. However, I also thought using water to convert to steam in the propulsion nozzles would increase the pressure significantly. There is a lot of energy in steam.
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    It does look over-grazed.
     
  8. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    WIN_20211017_16_49_47_Pro.jpg My neighbor mowed his yard today. And apples are everywhere here.:)
     
  9. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    20211014_161259.jpg Bananas are everywhere here. 20211014_160910_HDR.jpg 20211014_160744.jpg 20211007_110925.jpg
    My mower's in the shop.
     
  10. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    20211004_102634.jpg 20211004_102550.jpg
    Painting the seawall in Horta, July 1986
    Wow, my wife and I look young.

    -Will
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Time flies, Will. Bees too. 20211018_082357_HDR~2.jpg 20211018_082402_HDR~2.jpg 20211018_085539~2.jpg 20211018_085537~2.jpg
     
  12. Jolly Amaranto
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    Jolly Amaranto Junior Member

  13. Jolly Amaranto
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    Jolly Amaranto Junior Member

  14. Will Gilmore
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    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Since the Ganz Mill is part of the industrialization of Hungary, here's some recent pics I took.

    The Danube in Budapest. We are currently on tour in the region.
    20211105_135149.jpg

    Some bridge we crossed on the way from Hungary to Romania. I love cable stay bridges.
    20211110_114753.jpg

    -Will
     

  15. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    Double roller mill. They haven't changed all that much. I could set that thing up and have it running in no time. Did they have the old shaker table that went with it? The sieving methods have changed a lot and the old shaker tables didn't survive as well. Most were wooden boxes with stacked trays that sieved the finished flour and returned the coarse stuff to the fine-side roller. I can't even find a picture of the old stuff I worked with.
     
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