Questions about the Colin Archer inspire Eric Jr design

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Jake Holman, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. Jake Holman
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Kansas City, MO

    Jake Holman New Member

    I'm in dreaming stage about the Atkin & Co Eric Jr design. It's a really pretty double-ender design that reminds me of Suhaili and is, although small, capable of ocean crossings.
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    Looking at their website, I notice they don't mention the type of construction used, looking at some of their other pages for plans I'm assuming it's all wood. I have a few questions:
    1. Does anyone know what the construction method is in the plans?
    2. Has there been more than 1 built in the last couple decades? I can only find pictures of the "Tyke" cabin and would like to see more examples of the cabin.
    3. Could I build it by making a plywood mold with thin wood planks, covered in packaging tape, then put several layers of fiberglass over that and popping it off the mold, then glassing in some foam bulk-heads, decks, and frames?
    4. Would this require taking the design to someone to have them alter it for this construction method? (such as re-calculating the ballast needed, etc.
    I would really prefer to have the boat be made of as little wood as possible. Thanks in advance for your help. First post here.
     
  2. Dejay
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Europe

    Dejay Senior Newbie

    Hi Jake! On their home page it says "Unless otherwise specified, construction is traditional plank on frame."

    It's a pretty little boat. Unfortunately my expertise ends there :)

    But the other folks here will probably ask you "Did you ask the designer?" and "What are your requirements for this boat?" and "Why Fiberglass foam core?".

    Here is a link to different construction methods that I found useful.
     
  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Hi Jake, welcome to the forum . . :)

    Strip plank build could be an option for the 25' 2" Eric Jr. I think.

    Tom - MacNaughton talks about sheathed strip as an alternative to conventional plank on frame to build the 32' Eric.

    Good luck !
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
  4. Jake Holman
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Kansas City, MO

    Jake Holman New Member

    Thanks Dejay. I did not contact the designer yet. I think I'll ask them if they can do the plans for a fiberglass version. As far as requirements, I'd like a boat that is around 22 - 29', perhaps have a gaff rig, I'd like to alter the design to have a bowsprit with a staysail stay on the bow and a forestay at the end of the bowsprit, have a full keel, and constructed of fiberglass for ease of maintenance. I don't want the hull to be foam core, just made up of fiberglass and woven mat like a modern sailboat. but the deck supports and framing inside, as well as the deck, would be made of a foam glassed in, instead of wood.
     
  5. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The designers are long gone, dated plans are for sale though . . .

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    ‘‘ William (Billy) and John Atkin in the office at Anchordown in the late 1940's or early 1950's. ’’

    Anchordown is the dwelling and office in which they lived and used to ply their trades, Eric and Eric Jr. are some of Billy's designs.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  6. Jake Holman
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: Kansas City, MO

    Jake Holman New Member

    Yes, haha, I thought so too. Though maybe there is someone there that still does design? No idea. I could always take the plans to someone else with the alterations I want. Looking over Dejay's linked construction methods, I guess closest to what I'd want is the foam cored fiberglass, perhaps solid fiberglass would be too heavy.
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  7. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    As far as I know Pat only sells the plans, and doesn't work on them.
     

  8. Dejay
    Joined: Mar 2018
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    Location: Europe

    Dejay Senior Newbie

    Oh sorry, I see. I'm not sure but with the 1.5 tonne ballast maybe you can afford the weight (and cost) of solid fiberglass. I've also read opinions of someone who kind of hates foam core because once you get water in there you have hydraulic action destroying the foam. Not sure if that is that relevant. I think you need maintenance and have to watch out for damages for any construction method.

    I think making a mold the way you suggested isn't that easy, you'd need a more solid surface to squeeze the air out of the wet laminate.
     
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