Possibly stupid questons....

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by JLIMA, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. JLIMA
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: New Bedford Ma.

    JLIMA crazed throttleman

    Questions on rigging for a 15' gaff sloop.....

    1. Weight not being an issue is it okay (read workable but not perfect) to use something like these ( http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...splay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053 ) to save a few bucks on that part of the rigging?

    2. I plan on using a natural fiber rope for the running rigging ...not cotton but probably mannilla jute or sisal, or should I just go for polly? Darcon ect are a little pricey at the moment....

    3. Could anyone give me advice on putting together the jaws for the gaff.

    A little more background for those interested, I've successfully built 4 boats; the first was a 10' rowing pram that still sees some use on the local ponds, the second was a 13' cat rig (stitch n glue) the mast and all rigging was salvaged from a "free to good home, craigslist special" so very little actually learned from that one what is good practice although some lessons on what is not lol:rolleyes: the third and largest was a 22' stitch n glue center console that is still in active service Quahoging and other small time semi-commercial fishing (scup, stripped bass). The fourth and least fortunate an 18' with a small enclosed wheel house, was a total loss when on the way to the launch ramp she was taken out by a drunk driver and his suv.

    Thanks for any advice in advance Jay
     
  2. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    frank smith Senior Member

    That looks kike a pulley. I am sure the work the same way as the SS type . Keep the WD40 on hand . They used to be available with brass bushings , best if you can fine them.
     
  3. JLIMA
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: New Bedford Ma.

    JLIMA crazed throttleman

    Always have plenty of wd40 on hand, as well as about a thousand spare parts an a some odd lengths of plywood, glass and epoxy with hand tools for the same...just in case a repair has to happen on the beach somewhere.....
     
  4. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    You might want to spring for better lines - sisal and jute S T R E T C H and can make sailing interesting as the sail you raised to the top will migrate down as you go. As well, it isn't very hand friendly and sill disintegrate over time. Polypropylene (the yellow stuff) isn't much better. Stranded line generally become troublesome due to twist and taking a set, so braided line is your best choice.

    --
    CutOnce
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I've built plenty of gaff and boom jaws and I usually designed them as I went, without any drawings to speak of.
    In your case, I would find an existing design having the same approximate mast diameter and similar gaff angle. Use a hardwood like white oak or ash or a hard tropical wood for the jaws. Decide whether to use a toggle or just leather. I think a toggle is superfluous on such a small boat. Building jaws, while not difficult, is beyond the ability of a novice unless he is using a measured drawing, and even then, the accuracy of drilled holes and dealing with the hardware takes some general knowledge of shop processes.
    Don't use manila unless the look is all that matters. Three-strand nylon and dacron rope is twice as strong and it won't ever rot. Besides, the quality of modern manila is probably nothing like good yacht cordage used to be.
    As far as the blocks are concerned, bronze is available at Hamilton Marine in Portland, Maine for about $9.00 each for 5/16". I think you could start with the cheap iron pullies and later switch to the good ones.
     
  6. JLIMA
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    JLIMA crazed throttleman

    Thanks Alan I was planning on using leather, the main reason the question about the jaws is the only similar boat I've been able to locate has them simply glued and lashed together, and it seemed to me not the strongest approach and I really don't want anything to carry away on me if it can be avoided. I have a full workshop for both metal and wood working so my plan was to clamp and glue (epoxy) the jaws together, plane and sand everything down, then over to the drill press and through bolt it together, or so goes plan. I was thinking manila because the boat has a very olde tyme feel to her and the sails took way more than their alloted portion of the budget:eek:
     
  7. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    I just did a repair on a set that were white oak glued and screwed.
    The screws were stripping out..
    I have seen others that I preferred which were fastened with soft 1/4" rivets hammered over washers
     
  8. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I find that carriage bolts serve well especially where the hardware shows (isn't bunged over). The nutted end can be counter-bored. This isn't a true counter-bore since the cheek pieces aren't thick enough to allow a counter-bore big enough for a 7/16" socket (likely the size head for a 1/4" carriage bolt's nut).
    What you want is to recess the nut about 3/16" and cut the bolt-end flush with the nut. This allows disassembly for repairs.
    The construction should allow the gaff to twist (not swing) easily after the leather is applied. I like after leathering a good 1/2" gap on each side of the mast. I also glue strips around 1" wide to the inside of the jaws (which should be fully radiussed) before adding another, final layer of leather (tacked on with short copper carpet tacks). This provides additional cushioning. After a season on the water, you will see how much abuse the jaws have to take by examining the leather.
    You can also wrap the mast with copper sheeting where the gaff normally swings. I suggest you mark and install the copper based on wear marks from the first season.
     
  9. gggGuest
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    gggGuest ...

    Thing is the epoxy is pretty much as strong as the wood, so if it comes to your through bolt doing anything then the structure is probably disintegrating anyway...

    Nasty ropes and grotty blocks don't do anything for the feel of your new boat, which is always kinda dissapointing. Might be worth looking out to see if you can get some old wreck of a racing dinghy locally and strip it of braided ropes and reasonable fittings and fastenings then dump the rest... Its amazing how old ropes cheer up if they are put through the washing machine (yes, use fabric softener!) if not actually frayed...
     
  10. JLIMA
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: New Bedford Ma.

    JLIMA crazed throttleman

    I know that the epoxy is about as strong as the wood.... it's more of a psycological thing that nothing is strong enough or finished until a bolt is put through it.
    As for the salvaged riggging, most small dingies around here are real crap, frayed beyond any resemblance of usefulness or already stripped of anything that is semi-usable. Besides I'm not bothered by a ugly blocks, but the stretch of natural fiber is bothersome I'll keep a lookout for for something I can salvage from but I don't see myself pushing the launch date to the right, I can always jut replace them when I find them.....
     
  11. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    Send me a list of what you need to rig the boat via a pm.
    I have lots of cast offs including the full rig for a old Snipe, bronze shell blocks, cleats, track etc.
    It may be that I have something of use to you & will throw it on a truck for the cost of shipping.
     

  12. JLIMA
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: New Bedford Ma.

    JLIMA crazed throttleman

    Although I kinda like the rivet idea ......
     
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