Please help me identify this boat

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Jnmjude, Aug 7, 2018.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 1,328
    Likes: 53, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Keep in mind the props will probably be wrong. Probably too big. Maybe not. Just keep it in mind. If your engines don't sound like they are running wide open; they are limited by the prop(s) being too bigggg. You'll need to use some wisdom on the proper prop setup. A good way to do this is to know the hull weight after finished or to find a prop vendor that will assist you with some test props, etc. Since you have two, it is four times the money wrong once!
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,816
    Likes: 180, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Props are likely to be about right, I'd say, as they typically would power a boat that cruises at around 20 knots, or less. I am pretty sure I have actually seen the local versions of that hull with twin 50's, back in the long ago. Not an ideal choice, as you lose speed, have more upkeep etc. But the old 50hp OMC was pretty good on fuel, even back then, being an early example of loop-charged induction, that later became the norm on two-strokes. They have a good gearbox reduction, and would plane the boat without problems, but anything much beyond a 20 knot cruise, would be unrealistic. Which isn't really using the potential of the hull. Perhaps it would be better to plan around a single engine, in the 100 hp range.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018
  3. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    20kts is absolutely fine to me, especially in a boat i know nothing about until im comfortable with it. Id be pootling along at a similar speed for a while with a bigger set up, until i felt confident with the boat/handling/engine anyway.
    Its a compromise, and il have a look and see if i can pick up a second 50, or even a 60.
     
  4. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    Mercury 135 v6 offshore with full kit. 1998 Working. Worth a punt with something like a 15-20hp aux for trolling or stick to twin 50s?
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,816
    Likes: 180, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Buying second hand outboards is fraught with risk, of course, but that engine would be a good match, if serviceable. You have to consider engine shaft length of course, 20 " would be "OK", but 25" better. The 135 is probably 20", in this case, But you have a lot of work to do, before fitting engine(s). Maybe get a local outboard mechanic to look at any second-hand engine, before a purchase, they know what the typical problems are with various motors. One thing about the Mercury, by that stage, they were probably the least likely to have corrosion issues.
     
  6. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    Good to know thanks.
     
  7. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    I am going to take yhe advice about rebuilding the transom to full height. It needs replacing in part anyway so is easier. Im thinking of an outboard "pod" bracket. From what ive read about if they are a good idea or not they have the added bonus of increasing the boats planing area, although there was no explanation given as to why thats a good thing as opposed to a simple aluminium bracket
     
  8. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    Oh, and the merc is a longshaft, but would still do the transom.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,816
    Likes: 180, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Most people who change from outboard wells to pods, are looking to get more internal space, as the main reason. Improvements in performance (speed) are typically not significant in a situation such as your boat. There are various kinds of "pods" too, the main difference being those that are virtually a continuation of the hull, and those that are stepped up a few inches, and often with a negative slope underneath, so that underway at speed, the pod is not in contact with the water. The latter can cause porpoising tendencies in some boats, and especially if they were a little that way originally. Of course engine trim can be used to correct that, to some extent, but overall, pods on relatively small boats with heavy engines, are a mixed blessing. If not wanting extra internal space, I would not have one, on this hull, which is inclined to run a bit nose up naturally.
     
  10. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    It doesnt have an outboard well, and the deck space isnt huge due to the cabin. I was going to restore the transom so its not a cut out, then put a pod on for the outboard. Would a simple jackplate work as a bracket instead of a pod then? If the outboard was say 6inches off the stern on a plate/bracket would that cause porpoising too? Would trimtabs help, or putting the watertank etc more forward than aft to keep the nose down.
    The batteries were way up in the fore when i got the boat. I plan on a couple if not 3 bateries with solar panels to top up. so i was going to stick them back in the same place to add weight to the bow.
    Should i be thinking of putting the water tank as foward as possible too? Not keen on having a fuel tank in the cabin but had planned to have it centred under the helm.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,816
    Likes: 180, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    So it was a sterndrive ? Of course a pod is a live option, but there is a lot of work involved to arrive at something that is structurally sound, and functions well. Here is one that someone has on a Haines Hunter v19 ( could well be the same hull as yours).
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,816
    Likes: 180, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I suggest you Google " Haines Hunter V19", "restoration", "rebuild" etc., images search. Note you will see two distinct hull types, yours, and a later one, they are not close to identical, and you will see what others have done with pods. etc.
     
  13. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    If you look down the bottom of page 1 on this thread, youl see a photo of a hunter 18 with a pod. Thats the exact hull as mine and the guy who did it lives 15miles away from me. He bought the hull moulds and has made a few boats from it. Im off to his workshop on monday to discuss the possibly of him making a pod for me. The other option i have, and the cheapest by far, is buying a suitable used jackplate on ebay or the likes.
    I think a pod looks nicer though.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 6,816
    Likes: 180, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    So was your boat a sterndrive, not outboard powered ?
     

  15. Jnmjude
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 27
    Likes: 1, Points: 3
    Location: Uk

    Jnmjude Junior Member

    I think it was. But there certainly is no signs of inlet pipes or notches for exhausts etc unless these were terminating high on the transom. There is a patch of glass that looks like it covers a sterndrive hole on the inside of the transom and a patch higher than that on the outside.
    When i got the boat it had a 90hp outboard on the back. The guy bought it just for the engine and it had been sat for a while apparently. He knew little about the boat but was a marine engineer.
    The transom has been cut down by someone. Its possible it was already notched and someone cut it down further. What there was in the way of an "outboard well" was a hinged bit of wood at thw transom cut out height that could be locked upwards to act as a splash guard. This had a lump of rubber on it with notches so that the rubber could slide around and over the outboard transom brackets. Presumably this was someones invention and not an original feature. A good idea to stop spray coming in the boat, but wont stop a wave.
    Its the section of transom between where the outboard transom bracket grips over and the inside edge of the transom before the hinge starts that is rotting as you would expect.

    Does that make sense or should i find a bit of paper and draw what i mean?
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.