Plans Needed for Arrowhead 21ft Sloop

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Kcrow, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. Kcrow
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Kcrow New Member

    Hello all,

    I'm in need of possibly the impossible! I came across a 21ft Arrowhead Sloop, originally designed by Charles Mcalary (spelling?), and was originally published in a series of articles in Popular Mechanics in 1936 and again in a book Popular Mechanics released called "20 Boats You Can Build". The grandfather of a friend of mine had started to build this boat years ago, but did not finish and it's in rough shape. I'm hoping we can salvage some of it, but I'm going to need the original plans in order to make sure our measurments are correct. I have all of the Popular Mechanics articles, and was going to loft the design into full size Plans, but....there is no Table of Offsets. The company that was selling the plans last, DN Goodchild, is no longer in business, and the DNGoodchild@yahoo.com email they setup for correspondence shortly after going out of business, is no longer being monitored.

    I can't accept that this design dies with DN Goodchild, in today's day and age where the internet connects everything. Does anyone know where I can go to find a copy of the plans or does anyone have plans that they'd be willing to give me a copy of? Maybe just the table of offsets?? Any info someone can give me or point me in a direction, it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Depending on the information you have it would be possible to get the table of offset and the Body lines plan in digital format.
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Arrowhead is available in the public domain and plans are available online. This said, the plans aren't nearly as detailed as modern plans and also use less than modern techniques and materials. You can also contact Popular Mechanics, who will likely have PDF's of the old pages for this design. Svenson's site might also have this design.
     
  4. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Arrowhead Sloop - by - Charles H. McAlary
    ‘‘ Designed and built by Charles H. McAlary of Newport Beach, Calif., this sloop recently won a cup in a free-for-all race on Lake Arrowhead in the same state. ’’
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2017
  5. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    [​IMG] - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - [​IMG]


    Both above links give halfway down the page the option to choose from all issues of Popular Mechanics between January 1905 and December 2005, so that's 101 years and about 1,212 Popular Mechanics issues fully available there !
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Pages 594 and 595 have all you need to loft the boat.
     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The rest of the info is supplied there as a DIY boat build guide for the average handy person who is not an experienced shipwright.

    However there's now an abundant wealth of similar classic looking new designs available, with modern underwater lines and appendages (rudder + centerboard), and build with modern materials and techniques, which gives a better boat both in performance and durability, and with far less maintenance, and also far less trouble to build one. So for myself I would rather look for such a classic looking new design then using 1936 plans, which sure would give a nice build, for someone who doesn't care for the mentioned matters.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Notice the 1936 boat building in Popular Mechanics was done wearing a tie throughout the whole Arrowhead build . . :rolleyes:

    To keep it in style you'll need to copy that as well I think . . ;)

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Kcrow
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Kcrow New Member

    Thanks everyone for the answers. Having only lofted from full designs with all the info available, I was over thinking this. Ya'll are right, the drawing on pg. 594 does have everything I need. I have printed copies of these magazines already but, was not thinking in terms of this being so generalized for the DIY'er. I guess I was looking for more technical info! Angélique, I had noticed the tie too. It was the first thing I pointed out to my friend! I'm not sure how anyone could build a boat in today's age with all that epoxy and not ruin a tie:) But 1936 was pre-epoxy so that answers that!

    Thanks again!
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    These articles were written at a time, when building a boat was fairly common for the average guy, simply because it was the only way most could afford to do it. Tuck the tie into your shirt and move on . . .
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Don't want to get that tie tangled in a sander......ouch !
     
  12. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Come on, boatbuilders are problem solvers. When using a sander, use the clip on ties . . .
     
  13. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The boat designer and builder Charles H. McAlary was a visionary, so he had it all thought out, and had foreseen the upcoming popularity of electric belt sanders, as well as the development and upcoming popularity of epoxy, and so he provided the solution to these 2017 tie boat building problems within the 1936 plans !

    _Arrowhead_build_wearing_Tie_and_Apron_Charles_McAlay_Popular_Mechanics_Apr_1936_pg_597_fg_14_15.jpg

    Boat building wearing a tie and apron, 21 ft. Arrowhead Sloop by Charles H. McAlary, Popular Mechanics April 1936, page 597, fig. 14 and 15.​
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2017
  14. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Of course in present-day hurry there's no time to put on a tie and apron, so for nowadays classic boat building there's the Tie & Apron combination . . . :rolleyes:

    Pop and Shop in Brussels

    [​IMG]

    Note the classic Boat Builders Boots ! - (B³ as we say here)

    [​IMG]

    The ladies proudly showing a picture of PAR there . . . :cool:

    - - also available for children - -
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Obviously, taken before I went gray . . .
     
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