painting my boat

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by stdutcher, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. stdutcher
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: calif.

    stdutcher Junior Member

    I'm not sure if this the right area for this I'm new here, what I'm looking for is some info on painting a boat I bought a 1970 jet boat the top part of the boat has no gel coat on it all but the bottom and sides are prefect I'm guessing the sun faded the top, so can I paint this myself at home? fyi never painted before but have all the stuff in my garage (like a gun and compressor) also still trying to find out about the motor noise I have any help would be great
    thanks
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    Most marine paints do not have to be sprayed and are produced to roll and tip with brush. So do not worrt about never using a spray gun. Just follow directions and use a quality primer. Roll or Brush--these paints are made to flow together and finish smooth. Don't do it on a cold day.
     
  3. stdutcher
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: calif.

    stdutcher Junior Member

    Really rolled on? hmm did not know that, I was also wondering how i was going to paint the whole boat on the trailer but if i could roll it then I could lift it a little and paint where it sits on the boards
     
  4. yellow cat
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: magog

    yellow cat Junior Member

    paint a boat

    i have used Sico epoxied paint on my 1966 fiberglass sail boat, lightly heating the paint made a nice finish rolled and then feathered with brush. Came out decent.
    you can check alexseal.com paints, i have not used them yet but the more options you know, the better and their brochure shows potential . We used a teflon as bottom coat , we are in fresh water. I use teflon clear vc speed on my cats, algeas don't stick but it is a mat clear finish. Otherwise it is scrub once a week with acid green stuff ...
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    While there are formulations that can be rolled and tipped (any single part and some two part polyurethanes), skill is required. Lots of it.
    Single part paints have a shorter lifespan than two part paints, are not as hard, and are easier to apply. If you are going to do it yourself, a single part is probably your best choice. The job will be reasonably hard and relatively long-lasting. three to six years of normal use, depending on location on the boat (The sun is what kills the paint). Two part might get you seven to twelve years perhaps.
    Single is easier to touch up along the way.
    You can paint on the trailer by removing the bunk(S) or roller(s) one at a time. Just support the boat in other ways. Obviously, down there under the waterline the job doesn't need to be perfect, just functional.
    You'll pay around $75.00 to $90.00 for a gallon of primer and a gallon of finish, so with various other sundries you'll be up around $200.00 plus to do the job on a small runabout.
    Engine has a noise, huh?
     
  6. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Yes, that is done by professionals too. But, as mentioned, it requires some skills.

    And..... never!!! heat your paint! that was the worst advice one could give! You´re on the fine side, if boat and paint have the same temp. If the boat is slightly above the paint temp. is sometimes fine with a 2k PU paint. Vice versa NO.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  7. El Sea
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: St Petersburg, Florida

    El Sea Junior Member

    Use PVC primer to paint the hull.
    Sand entire area with 220 grit.
    (the PVC primer is a excellent way to fine flaws)
    Address flaws, glaze or filler as required.
    Sand repaired areas with 220 grit.
    Roll the paint on with a six inch foam roller to a max area of 6 square feet.
    Apply paint very, very, very thin.
    Using a good quality brush, brush lightly, so lightly, vertically from starting point to end of paint.
    Roll the paint on with a six inch foam roller to a max area of 6 square feet.
    Apply paint very, very, very thin with ending at last brushed area.
    Using a good quality brush, brush lightly, so lightly, vertically from starting at last brushed stroked area and work to end of painted area.

    The most important issue is to s t r e t c h the paint.

    I will be painting my trawler this year doing the same.

    Good Luck,

    Luther Carrier
    Absolute Tank Cleaning
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    voila...... a proper advice.
     
  9. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I agree with El Sea too, regarding vertical brushing to prevent runs (a badger hair brush is good for this, so are some expensive nylon brushes and some china bristle brushes (as they come, they are usually way too thick for tipping. Thick bristles are for carrying paint, not tipping it. i've thinned down the bristles to half their original bulk with a razor and had good success.
    Rollers pull away from the surface fast, creating bubbles, and tipping breaks the bubbles.
    Note: On flat surfaces, try thinning the paint even more and roll only, without tipping. If the consistency is right, the paint will smooth out and appear sprayed.
     
  10. El Sea
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: St Petersburg, Florida

    El Sea Junior Member

    Don't be upset with your first impression of the brushed stroked area, as the paint cures it will Shrink and pull everything together.
    Just take it slow and steady.
     
  11. stdutcher
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: calif.

    stdutcher Junior Member

    Thanks for all the info on painting I might just pay someone to spray it for me sounds like it takes some work to do it yourself with a roller either way Ill post some pictures of before and after,, now if i could get this much advice for the oil pan noise i might make it in the water by summer I say might cause everyone knows boats are nothing but money pits thanks again for all your helpful tips
     
  12. pdave1s
    Joined: May 2006
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    Location: Clearlake Oaks, Ca

    pdave1s http://impboatclub.com

    RE:paint

    Believe it or not, the nicest paint job I ever had done was on an old glasspar phaeton, $295 at of all places MIRACLE AUTO PAINTING. They used a 2 part epoxy, mixed in the spraying process, that left a flawless finish!!!(I strippped the boat down to bare hull in preparation for this. Wetsanded entire hull and deck with 600 wet/dry before taking to paint shop. That was 4 years ago, and though I dont still own it, I still see it from time to time, and it still looks good as new
    Dave
     
  13. SteveP68
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: Fort Lauderdale

    SteveP68 Yacht Carpenter

    Rolling and tipping is by far the most economical and practical way to paint or varnish a boat. It’s even environmentally safe….. well more so.
    No overspray and no need for expensive spray equipment.

    The biggest problem with painting a glass boat is that the boat –usually- has at some point and time been waxed and buffed with a silicone based wax and if this wax is not removed it will cause fisheyes in the new finish. Sanding will not remove the wax you need to use wax and grease remover such as Awl Prep wax and grease remover.

    I am a big fan of Awlgrip products but there are other paint manufacturers that make more economical marine grade paints that are also good to use, but what ever you do don’t skimp on the cost of the paint as you get what you pay for.

    My Roll and Tipp kit usually consist of a roller tray, inserts for same, 4 “ roller frame, Corona brand foam roller covers (tubes) can be cut to length) Corona brand urethane bristle brushes and a good paintbrush roller spinner.

    After all the sanding and cleaning is done, before I start painting I always dip my brush in the same reducer that I used to thin my paint or varnish and give it a good spin in my Shure-Line brush and roller cleaner to remove any loose hairs as there is nothing more irritating than finding a loose hair in a otherwise perfect job.

    Don’t forget safety. Wear a paint suit, eye protection and a good respirator during the entire project. You don’t want to breathe the dust or fumes into your lungs and you don’t want get paint or reducer on your skin either.
     

  14. Kaptin-Jer
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Location: South Florida

    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    Go over to the Fiberglass forum. There is a large discussion on Awl Grip that covers roll and tip as well as spray. Makes for interesting reading, lots of pictures. The guys that are subscribed are pretty knowledgeable and should be able to answer your questions about Awl grip as well as other coatings.
     
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