Paint System for planked hull

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Mudz, Jun 25, 2007.

  1. Mudz
    Joined: Dec 2006
    Posts: 9
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    Location: New Zealand

    Mudz Junior Member

    I am look for the best paint system for a carvel planked boat. We have been considering sheathing the hull with glass first but from what I have read so far it's doesn't sound like such a good idea.
    We basically want a paint that is flexable enough not to crack when the planks move. Any suggestions or tips would be great.
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    The standard is an oil-based (alkyd) paint of high quality, with high solids and urethane reinforcement---- known as single-part polyurethane, they aren't as hard (nor as brittle) as two-part poly paint. Petit Easypoxy is very good, Interlux makes an equivilant, and no doubt there are many more.
    I would say those paints last about half as long (3-6 years) as the two part paints, cost about half as much, and are far easier to apply.
    With paint, it is best to match the hardness of the paint to the material under it. In general, that means a hard surface like fiberglass, when banged or struck, will hold two-part paint intact, and a softer surface like cedar will dent in without breaking the paint at the edges.
    There is a tendancy, I think, to over-doing when it comes to paint products. if the goal is to save labor by going with an automotive finish (so that repainting isn't an issue for a decade), it may be false economy since the labor to paint two-part once (or pay for it done) exceeds the cost off painting twice with single-part.
    Also, touching up single-part is as simple as opening the same can you did the jpb with, and therefore encourages doing so, while touching up two-part is probably going to be done with a best-match single-part.
    Besides, a wood planked hull lends itself to a brushed paint job. Wood has grain direction, and so do brush strokes.
    Keep it simple!

    Alan
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Ditto the Easypoxy, I use it often on timber built craft and it works well, making a lousy painter look pretty good. Two part linear polyurethanes will not tolerate the plank movement, though will shine real pretty for a while.

    Painting and getting good, long lived results is all about prep, the actual brush or sprayer in hand time, is less then 5% of the job. Make it smooth, make it want to stick well and you'll get reasonable performance from your paint job. Insure the seams are not real fresh and have been knocked down since the last caulking.
     
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