Oz goose vs passage maker?

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Jpav, Jan 13, 2021.

  1. Jpav
    Joined: Jan 2021
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    Jpav New Member

    Hi I am new to this forum and am looking for advice on my first boat build. The two designs that appeal to me the most are the oz goose and the passage maker dinghy. I have very little experience sailing so something that is fun and easy to learn on would be a plus. I want something that can comfortably carry about 700 pounds. It will primarily be a sail boat but something that rows nice would be good as well. I am thinking that I would rig it with ether a lug or a lateen sail, recommendations in that department would be helpful as well. Any advice would be appreciated, including other options for boat design or sail rig thanks.
     
  2. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Welcome to the Forum Jpav.

    For general reference for other readers, here is a link to the Oz Goose -
    Oz Goose Sailboat - Cheap Simple Plywood Boat https://www.opengoose.com/

    Oz Goose.jpg

    And a link to the Passagemaker Dinghy from CLC.
    The Passagemaker Dinghy: Only 90 Pounds! https://www.clcboats.com/modules/catalog/boat.php?category_qn=wooden-sailboat-kits&subcat_qn=passagemaker&code=passagemaker-dinghy-sailboat-kit

    Passagemaker dinghy from CLC.jpg

    The Oz Goose would probably be easier to build, while the Passagemaker would probably be nicer to row (and to sail), and 'looks' more like a stereotype classic dinghy.
     
  3. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The Oz goose is about as simple a build as you can imagine. The Passagemaker is far more sophisticated but is a more complicated build. Passagemaker might be the better choice if used in rougher weather. If budget considerations are important then the Oz Goose is the clear winner.
     
  4. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Will either one of these really take 700#?
     
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  5. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    That is a good point which I had overlooked - Jpav, why would you want to have such a large carrying capacity?
    700 lbs is about the weight of 4 large adults, and they would all be getting in each other's way terribly, even if the boat is being used as a simple tender, never mind as a sailing dinghy.
     
  6. Jpav
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    Jpav New Member

    The 700 pound number is on the High estimate of what I might put in it, but with myself my wife and our daughter, plus what ever junk we might be bringing, I figure we would probably have about 500 pounds. I just figured if it could take 700 ish than I have capacity to spare, whitch is probably a good thing with a less experienced sailor. I was thinking it could be used to haul us and some camping gear to a few places that I like to camp. I also like to gold pan and sometimes I bring buckets of dirt back with me. I am not expecting to load it like that very often, I was just looking for a boat that might be able do it safely if I needed to.
     
  7. missinginaction
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    I can't speak to the Oz Goose but I do have some experience with Chesapeake. I built an Eastport Nesting Pram back in 2019. Thanks to the whole COVID thing it needs a paint job yet and the hardware installed. For a beginner (or even some experienced with boat building) building from plans will be a challenge. However, buying the kit is a whole different thing. As you probably know they use computer numerical controlled equipment to cut and route the parts. I was impressed with the precision this machine delivered. Everything fit. Perfectly. When I laid the panels that made up the hull on a table I remember thinking "That's pretty neat". If you go with the Passagemaker kit you will see what I mean. CLC is good with the support too. You can call them with questions. They answer the phone and don't treat you like an idiot. Good customer service. There are boat specific forums on their website as well.

    The Passagemaker is bigger than what I built but similar in design. Most of it can be done solo but you'll probably want an extra pair of hands when you stitch up the side panels as they are a bit awkward. Here's a tip for the side panels. I used some small ratcheting tie down straps (just 1" from Home Depot) to hold things together while I stitched.

    If you haven't worked with fiberglass before you really should learn how to apply cloth properly and learn how to form fillets and fill joints properly. Practice a bit so you'll be comfortable with the techniques before you're working on the real thing. If you need resources just ask.

    Good Luck and welcome to the forums,

    MIA
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  8. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Jpav, MIA makes some very good points above - if you do want to build a boat, a kit would be the way to go.

    But it might be better to not rush in to it all so enthusiastically immediately - how about going on a sailing course first with your wife and daughter, to confirm that they will like going on sailing adventures?
    If they are enthusiastic about sailing, and are keen on going camping, then I think you ideally want a bigger boat for the purpose that you have described above - trying to do all of this in a Passagemaker (or especially so re an Oz Goose) could be a recipe for divorce.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
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  9. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Bajansailor has given the best advice. If you want to go camping or have other adventures, then a bigger boat is a far better choice. Building a bigger boat is no more difficult than building a small one. In fact there are some elements of the big one that are easier.

    You have explored the OZ Goose so now have a serious look at its bigger cousin, the Goat Island Skiff, from the same designer. The GIS sails very well and has space for the people that you have mentioned. It is also a simple build.
     
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  10. Jpav
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    Jpav New Member

    Thanks to every one! You all have been very helpful. One reason I was interested in these 2 boats was for the ease of transportation, but after some of your advice I am seriously interested in the goat island skiff. Even though it would usually just be me, I still want something that can be loaded up with the family and gear, and the goat island skiff looks like it would be much better at those times. It also looks like it would be easy to build, and it looks good ( at least compared to the goose).
     
  11. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The GIS is a proven design that is a lively sailor. It is basically a flattie or flat bottomed skiff. It can stand some moderate weather but due to its flat bottom it will pound when in a lumpy sea. It pounds and will be noisy when it is upright and at moderate to high speed.. When heeled a few degrees it rides without serious pounding, or the loosening of your eye teeth. This is typical behavior for flatties, or sharpies as they are sometimes called. When under sail it will be heeled a little bit in any course except dead downwind.

    There are a gazillion boats of this type including one of them in my back yard. You can find lots of these designs by exploring the internet. You do need to be a bit cautious if the design is not well proven for sailing. A similar boat, one that looks almost like the sailing flattie, has no aft rocker. That one is intended as a power boat and will not sail or row as well.

    Not to confuse the issue, but while exploring, take a look at the Bolger Gypsy. It is a nominal 16 footer that has a "trapeze" bottom that makes it a pretty good rowing boat and a more than adequate sailor although it carries only a modest amount of sail in a really simple sprit boom rig. It will not be nearly as fast as the GIS but it will excel in light airs. It will have a smoother ride than a classic flattie. Gypsy is an easy build and will not present much of a challenge to build. I mention this one only because it is cheap and easy and works well for its' intended purpose. This one will be a little bit more tender than a typical flattie of similar dimensions but it is safe enough for most conditions.
     
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  12. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Bolger's Gypsy is a wonderful design - that is a good call M!
    Here is a link to her on the Instant Boats site -
    Gypsy – 15′ x 4′-4″ – H.H. Payson & Company https://www.instantboats.com/product/gypsy-15-x-4-4/

    She is also mentioned in detail in their book 'Build the New Instant Boats' (I have a copy) - this would be well worthwhile buying.
    Build the New Instant Boats – H.H. Payson & Company https://www.instantboats.com/product/build-the-new-instant-boats/

    And here are some photos of a Gypsy for sale -
    Bolger Gypsy sailboat for sale https://www.sailingtexas.com/sbolgergypsya.html


    Gypsy.jpg
     
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