Over heavy fibreglass rowing boat

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by valvebounce, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 563
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hello,
    I have a 10ft fibreglass rowing boat,it has a deep keel and side runners.
    The boat has got much heavier,the gunnels are 2" square and although fibreglass covered they are timber.The gunnels are soaked,although the timber is still intact.
    I suspect the keel and runners are in the same state.Although it's not expensive,it is a nice little boat with a 5' beam.
    I am toying with the idea of cutting the fibreglass at the outer corners on the keel and gunnels,and removing the timber.My idea is to replace the timber with
    suitably sized pvc trunking and fibreglassing it in.
    It handles well on the water with an outboard or oars,but is a monster to handle out of the water.
    Anybody got any ideas?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Do you mean cut the corner and slide the timber out?
     
  3. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 563
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hi Gonzo,Yes,if you can imagine a box section,then I plan to remove one face and slide the timber out.(Probably need to give it a little help)
     
  4. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    Location: Delta BC

    JSL Senior Member

    First step: you might want to work out the weight saving as it could be the FRP (GRP) that's the weight problem. For the wood core you could drill out a sample with a hole saw and determine the density & then the weight saved.
    If the wood has been bonded in, you might not be able to remove it easily anyway.
     
  5. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 563
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hi JSL,
    Good idea,the middle keel is 8"X2.5" on average,which, if it is wet timber could weigh quite a lot.I know the Gunnels are timber and soaked because I fitted new oarlocks and bushes.I took the main stringers out of a project boat recently and used a rotary hammer with a flat chisel in it.The stringers were bonded in,but the drill coped with it quite well.I have another boat,so time is no object.
    Thanks for your input
    "V"
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Are you sure it's wood and not water soaked foam?
     
  7. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 563
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hello PAR.
    I'm pretty sure it's timber,it's an old boat.The gunnels are definitely FG covered timber.
    At the stern the keel is 4" wide.
    I've decided to put a saw through it and have a look.
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 494, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A drill bit through some key locations will tell you the same and a little hole is easier to fix afterward. They've been using foam since the early 60's in production boats. I've seen 1 ton bow riders that weighed nearly 1,000 pounds more because of soaked foam.
     

  9. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 563
    Likes: 12, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    I'll take your suggestion and use a drill Par.
    The boat is single skinned.A previous owner has fitted a box seat at the bow,one at the stern and one in the centre.I had a bit of trouble with centre seat,the previous owner had fitted a steel pipe to allow for any water to pass from front to rear and vice versa.He had it 4" too high and it had rusted.I cut it out and replaced it and seated it in the bottom channel in the hull.It was encased in builders foam and wet partway up.
    I cut out the damaged foam,put a couple of coke bottles in it and filled it back up with builders foam.Then sealed it back up with fibreglass matting.
    I suspect the bow and stern seats have blown foam in them.
    I am contemplating removing all three seats and starting afresh and filling the seats with strips of 2"impervious polystyrene board.
    I've got plenty of time on my hands,and materials will be no problem.
    I have my 14' dinghy for doing a bit of fishing in the meantime,and here in the Uk the mackerel season is about to start.
     
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