Osmosis on the deck?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by SwedenYachtsDaniel, May 23, 2018.

  1. SwedenYachtsDaniel
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Norway

    SwedenYachtsDaniel New Member

    Hello everyone.
    I bought a 1978 Morgan Giles 30 about two years ago. For various reasons I haven't used it much. So I'm selling this boat.
    I had a potential buyer looking at the boat. There was some blisters on deck . Can it be osmosis on deck? Ore something else? I always thought osmosis was an under water problem?
    Any advice on this issues would be greatly appreciated.
    Regards Daniel
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 154
    Likes: 6, Points: 18
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Congrats the gelcoat lasted fifteen years longer than expected. Over time the gelcoat was worn or oxidized away until become too thin. The holes are micro voids from factory layup. Water intrusion aided in the popping of voids.

    This is a very common condition on older boats and should not be a deal breaker
     
  3. SwedenYachtsDaniel
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Norway

    SwedenYachtsDaniel New Member

    Thanks Blueknarr for answering.
    I thought it was something like that. But people who work with osmosis treatment had said it was . I haven't been in touch with them personally so I can't really know .
    What is the recommendation for the cracks , does it need to be taken care of right away ? Can it be as is a few years without damaging the glassfiber to bad?
    Any tips, ideas are welcome.
    Thanks
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The quick way to determine if they are really osmosis is to pop one open and give it a good sniff. If it has a distinct chemical smell, yeah it's possible you have some osmosis going on, though I don't think so. I agree with Bluenarr in that some areas have simply worn out and this pot-marked symptom has occurred. Sand them out, fill with a thickened goo of choice, fair and finish as you'd like (paint, gelcoat, etc.). Yes, you'll likely get more time from these areas, assuming not a lot of traffic over them. They'll likely propagate a bit in the general area, but if the repairs are put off a year or two, very little more effort or materials will be required to fix it.
     
  5. SwedenYachtsDaniel
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Norway

    SwedenYachtsDaniel New Member

    Thanks PAR for for the information. Good to hear. Then I don't need to think to much about it eirig away. I haven't seen any blisters that holds any liquid. So think it's ok .
    Daniel
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 465, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, you'll be fine, fill and fair as usual, prep for finish. If you look at every square inch of any hull and deck, you'll find lots of these sort of blemishes. It just depends on how anal you are to clean them up.
     

  7. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 1,691
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    I didn't see any osmotic blistering in those pics, only what was described earlier, thin gel coat and a laminate that was poorly rolled out and air was left in it. I also see multiple colors of the finish, this may be an illusion from the camera and not actually that way though.
     
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