optimal TVA hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by burton.lewis5, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. burton.lewis5
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    Location: Knoxville, TN

    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    Ladies and Gentlemen,
    Thank you for access to your expertise. I had a 25 h.p. Johnson stolen from my 14' aluminum fishing boat:mad: A friend gave me his rotten Larson Lapliner with a 40 h.p. non-tiller long shaft. I am looking for the best hull to carry 4 fishermen around TVA lakes using this motor. I would also like to use this boat to occasionally pull one skier. TVA lakes are deep with steep sides. They are narrow and protected by mountains. Essentially they are big ponds. The roughest water encountered are boat wakes. I am interested in fuel efficiency. Building a hull is not out of the question. I looked at Bartender boats. Beautiful, but silly for a mountain lake. What would you recommend I do to get back on the water?
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There is no "best hull" but there might be a hull well suited to your needs. I think a modest v hull will be your best bet. It'll be much more efficient then a deep v and more stable under foot when fishing. Have a look at Glen-L and Bateau.com offerings.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    4 fishos in a 40hp outboard boat is a full quota, maybe a rectangular plan hull like a v-nose punt around 15' would suit.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A Sea Sled would be my choice for this. Lots of room, speed potential, a dry ride, shallow when necessary, like at the ramp, etc.
     
  5. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    You might just get the guy up with a Lund aluminum boat if he's 160# or lighter. Brings back memories. I'm a UT grad.
     
  6. burton.lewis5
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    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    I have been looking at garvey hulls since consulting with par and Mr. Efficiency. Before coming here, I was all over the place with boat designs. I had wondered if a reverse deadrise hull would be a good option. Would a sea sled hull have advantages with an outboard motor? I have read on another boatdesign thread that these hulls tend to have problems in a turn such as leaning out. I have also read that the complicated lines are hard for a beginner to build. Does anyone know of a small design appropriate for a 40 h.p. motor?
     
  7. burton.lewis5
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    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    Phil, I kept looking at a Lund Deep vee for sale under $2000 dollars here in Knoxville, but I was sure she would be under powered with my 40.
     
  8. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    If it's a 16', see if you can borrow it and try it. Yes, a bit underpowered, but you're back on the water and I doubt you would have any trouble selling it when you wanted something bigger, or just keep your eyes peeled for a bigger motor. I got a couple of seasons out of a $100 Evenrude 135.
     
  9. burton.lewis5
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    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    I just found the TX18 tunnel hull at Bateau.com. That is an exciting option.
     
  10. burton.lewis5
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    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    They call the TX 18 an experimental design. :(
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    All Sea Sleds can be considered experimental deigns. The TX-18 is a typical, "modernized" sled design and will offer better speeds then you'll get with more conventional hull shapes, plus is a lot more stable at rest. It will corner flat, not "tip out", which makes some feel as though this is wrong, but it's not, juts slightly different.

    If looking for a fishing boat in calm to moderately rough conditions, in shallow and deep water, a sled is a good option.
     
  12. burton.lewis5
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    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    O.K. I have been through almost all of the threads brought up by the search terms "Hickman Sled 18". I cannot find any examples of a finished boat according to these plans. I did find the Texas Sleds. I have read about the possibility of cavitation problems brought on by the aireated water at the transom. I have read about hydrolic jack plates used to compensate and allow the prop to reach solid water. I have read about hull modifications that allow air into the inverted v reducing the suction by venting the tunnel and allowing the water to drop out of the v. I have read about surface piercing props, though I am unclear what their function would be. I have read about the addition of trim tabs to reduce porpoising. Can anyone direct me to information about a completed Bill Jackson 50's model sled? Does anyone know how the H.S. 18 bonus plans included in the TX18 Bateau boat accomodate known issues of the inverted v hull? I hope I don't aggravate anyone with my lack of experience, and I appreciate your patience with my curiosity.
     

  13. burton.lewis5
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    burton.lewis5 Junior Member

    For anyone that follows this thread in the future, I have found what I believe to be a good resource that explains surface peircing props, and their relationship to cavitation. http://www.well.com/~pk/SPAprofboat.html
     
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