Open boat capsize recovery demos

Discussion in 'Stability' started by Richard Woods, Aug 31, 2016.

  1. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    we knew about, and had allowed for, the longboats. They were supposed to go out before we started the demo. The kayaks we weren't told about

    RW
     
  2. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    Hey Ike, you should have introduced yourself, I would have liked to meet you.

    This is the picture of Richard (on the right) and I (on left) that Kurt Hughes, of "Kurt Hughes Multihull Design", took for me after the demo on Saturday with my phone. We were on the fore-deck of the "Victoria 5". The sail of the demo capsize boat is to the right of my face in the background after a successful recovery.
     

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  3. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    +1

    RW
     
  4. SukiSolo
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    SukiSolo Senior Member

    I seem to remember having to swim 50 yards (in those days!), but not the underwater thing. Fully clothed, no wetsuits/drysuits or buoyancy aids. Personally I'm a bit ambivalent on personal buoyancy, too much is definitely bad if you are trapped under a sail or inside a cabin. Also in good weather in a dinghy and a benign environment you sweat badly and get too hot from even a 50n jacket. Yet it is great for security and warmth when cold and rough, so if in doubt and especially on the sea I always take the jacket in the boat. No brainer, if rough.

    It is a hard call, nothing actually gives perfect safety. Half the battle is having due respect for the power of the sea, something often only a certain ammount of experience gives. The unfortunate Kielder accident some years ago shows partly what too much buoyancy can do under a sail, but having read the MAIB report etc etc the safety boat crew were also not up to the job. Again an experience issue of just watercraft regrettably.

    Nice work Richard, glad it was appreciated. Thanks to all for the photos too.
    No substitute for the real drill?, a couple of n/as' I've talked to have said even after calculating, it's good to confirm and be flexible about any useful mods.
     
  5. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I never sailed a Cadet, its just what friends told me, although I did also know the 50yards rule.

    I agree re buoyancy aids, we also discussed them on Sunday. Bulky ones make it hard to reboard, auto inflate are dangerous on multihulls. And a Laser sailor drowned when his tiller extension caught in his buoyancy aid straps (which is why Olympic sailors all wear lycra over their buoyancy aids.

    We were thrown out of the room on Sunday, otherwise we could have kept the discussion going for ever

    RW
     

  6. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

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