Ok complete change of plan

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Boston, May 4, 2010.

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  1. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    Boston,
    I assume your'e going to Jamaica instead of Alaska.

    Easy
     
  2. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Don't take any of the HP charts on Buehler's site seriously...they are way off. Apparently George doesn't understand the difference between EHP and required shaft HP....we've discussed this before on other threads..

    A very wise man once wrote "to be popular with amateur builders, a design must look easy to build". Mr. Buehler excels at producing designs that appear simple to build....thus amateurs with little experience snap them up.... I would suggest they are a very poor choice to complete with mirror finish and ss everything. Fancy finish on a cheap hull is a bad investment, the buyers of the expensive Chinese production versions will find this out when they try to sell in a market full of Nordhavns with similar price tags.

    Boston is not looking for a design that appears easy to build.....he is looking for something more refined.....as to the Sea Dawn....I think he'll find that for $5-10k you can buy (in reasonable condition) any number of these type sailing cruisers....the simplest thing is to buy one and build her a new hull and deck........
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    What is simple about buying a use boat and then having to build a new hull and deck?
     
  4. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Because you have in hand the ballast, spars, rigging, hardware, ports, machinery, etc......these include many pieces that just aren't available off the shelf any more. You can generally buy an old wooden boat for the new price of her portlights!!!

    I don't know that this one needs a new hull.........

    http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listing/boatMergedDetails.jsp?boat_id=1816680&ybw=&units=Feet&access=Public&listing_id=1295&url=
     
  5. u4ea32
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    u4ea32 Senior Member

    Tad, your Yellow Cedar has come up here and other threads before. It looks very attractive. I like a lot about it, but I've got a couple of questions:

    How did you get the displacement up to 15,000 lbs? An awful lot of lead ballast?

    With that much lead ballast, why do you say its only a coastal cruiser? Just the big windows? Or something more?

    Personally, I would think all of these features would enable serious voyaging: The round bottom would give a nice slow motion; The very low center of gravity would give excellent ultimate stability; lots of room under the pilothouse for stabilizers; That galley looks great, located up and aft with that all too essential 360 degree view of the horizon from the galley.
     
  6. u4ea32
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    u4ea32 Senior Member

    Malabar XV !?!?! That should be in a fine museum, not chopped up for salvage!
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  8. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Lobster?

    That looks like it would be a nice Lobster/Charterboat.

    It needs a good engine like a Cummins QSM11 715 HP Turbo Intercooled in it.

    I bet it would be a good stick boat made nice & light and hit 40 knots

    How much would the boat cost ?

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    no clue what it might cost to build but its rated for a 70 hp and 10 knots. My suspicion is if you overpower it your looking for trouble.

    Tad I'll check out that link

    OU812
    yes I agree if I rebuilt it I would keep her true to form just as she is
    Ive always thought Alden's designs had a lot of class

    wicked you are right
    maybe the reason I liked that one so much is because now that you mentioned it
    it does remind me of the old school lobster boats
    except for the mast that is

    oh and no Easy its not the ideal NW passage boat but its got a lot of appeal and with a topper for the cockpit it would be serviceable
    that
    and its sorta a conglomeration of a lot of the advice Ive been getting

    now that Im working again the up front cost is less of an issue
    which puts an auxiliary back on the plate
     
  10. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    I stand by what I said-he doesn't even read.
    I don't care .02 if he takes my advice or not,but at least read.

    As for Buehler,I don't care for his stuff or his fuel economy claims-at the end of 5-7 years from now (maybe) if B gets a boat built and spending $$$,$$$-the difference between 3 or 5 gph is useless to even contemplate.
    Especially when he may motor at most 100-200 hours a year.

    And judging from what B has said concerning $,he is looking for a non expensive boat.

    So buying an old boat like you say,and stripping it seems to be the best/cheapest thing for him.
     
  11. Pierre R
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    Pierre R Senior Member

    I think Tad lists loaded displacement or Design Water Line Displacments(DDWL) instead of empty displacements. Many boat builders list empty weights. Sometimes hard to compare.
     
  12. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    I don't think Yellow cedar has ballast. My 30' Willard has 4,000 lbs ballast w the same displacement and a heavy build so if Yellow Cedar did have ballast it would have light construction. I would like to see Yellow Cedar w an 11' beam, 4,000 lbs of ballast and about 42hp.

    Easy
     
  13. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    The first Yellow Cedar is a foam cored structure and has about 2200 pounds of lead in her box keel. I don't know about hull #2, which I believe is solid glass and perhaps plywood deck and house, but she appears to be floating fairly high.
     
  14. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Here a direct link to that^ - http://dngoodchild.com/5452.htm - Nice boat!

    Here one which is somewhat between your original plan and the one above.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Reuel Parker single-chine plywood dory cruising powerboat or motorsailer yacht. (diesel inboard or 2 four-cycle outboards in a well)

    L.O.A. - 50'
    L.W.L. - 44' 9"
    BEAM - 12' 6"
    DRAFT - 1' 10 ½"
    DISPLACEMENT - 25,700 lbs.

    This vessel may also be built as a motor-sailer, with a centerboard (the trunk is located under the pilot-house sole) or a low-aspect-ratio fin keel and ballast bulb.

    [​IMG] (the biggest pic I could find on the motor sailer)

    Here the drawings and the specs.


    Good Luck!
    Angel


    (attachment: that^ motor sailer pic 700% enlarged)
     

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    Last edited: May 21, 2010

  15. Stumble
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Boston,

    You might want to take a peak at the Columbia 50, and similar designs. They are very well founded, have a real classic look to them, and while not cheap, they run in the 100K range. Plus they have wood everywhere, satisfying your need to sand and revarnish teak :D

    Personally having sailed one across the Gulf of Mexico twice, once through 15+ foot seas, I would have no problem takeing them anywhere in the world, except for perhaps ice flows.
     
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