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Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by ImaginaryNumber, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Heat waves could kill farmers within six hours in parts of China https://www.newsweek.com/failing-crops-death-humidity-and-mass-migration-how-heatwaves-could-soon-make-1056231
    Another remake of "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" ?
     
  2. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    On August 1, we'll have consumed more resources than the Earth can regenerate in a year | Insider

    • Earth Overshoot Day is the day each year when humans have consumed a year's worth of the planet's natural resources. In 2018, it falls on August 1.

    • The Country Overshoot Day for the US is much earlier: March 15, 2018. If everyone lived like US residents, we would need five earths to meet our annual consumption.

    • Want to reduce your ecological footprint ? Changing the way you get around and the food you eat can have the biggest impact.
     
  3. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  4. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change-driven droughts are getting hotter, UCI study finds | University of California, Irving

    In a study published today in Science Advances, researchers at the University of California, Irvine report that temperatures during droughts have been rising faster than in average climates in recent decades, and they point to concurrent changes in atmospheric water vapor as a driver of the surge.

    “Available soil moisture can remove surface heat through evaporation, but if the land is dry, there is no opportunity to transport it away, which increases the local temperature,” said lead author Felicia Chiang, a UCI graduate student in civil & environmental engineering. “Atmospheric conditions can influence soil, and we argue that they’re shaping the temperatures we experience during droughts.”
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Blocking sunlight to cool Earth won’t reduce crop damage from global warming | University of California, Berkeley

    Injecting particles into the atmosphere to cool the planet and counter the warming effects of climate change would do nothing to offset the crop damage from rising global temperatures, according to a new analysis by University of California, Berkeley, researchers.

    By analyzing the past effects of Earth-cooling volcanic eruptions, and the response of crops to changes in sunlight, the team concluded that any improvements in yield from cooler temperatures would be negated by lower productivity due to reduced sunlight. The findings have important implications for our understanding of solar geoengineering, one proposed method for helping humanity manage the impacts of global warming.

     
  6. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Earth's Soil Is Hyperventilating Thanks To Climate Change | Live Science

    • There's about twice as much carbon dioxide stored in Earth's soil as there is floating around the atmosphere.
    • Microbes gorge on the carbon stored in plant matter, and then release carbon dioxide as a natural byproduct of this feeding
    • As global temperatures rise, microbes in the soil have been releasing CO2 faster than plants can snatch it up again.
    • The rate of CO2 released from Earth's soil has increased globally by about 1.2 percent in just 25 years.
    • It's possible that all that extra CO2 will feed a self-intensifying loop of atmospheric warming and soil respiration over the years to come.

    The study is published in the journal Nature.
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees | Science Daily
    • Biomass Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) power stations produce energy by burning biomass crops and then storing the CO2 produced underground.

    • A study published in Nature has concluded that BECCS could instead increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere if the crops are assumed to replace existing forests.

    • How well BECCS works depends on factors such as the choice of biomass, the fate of initial above-ground biomass and the fossil-fuel emissions offset in the energy system.
     
  8. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    I saw a video of interviews at a recent WASP political rally and an older woman wound up about climate change, her argument was not necessarily that it was a hoax but it was 80 years in the future and nobody would be alive by then.
     
  9. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    What does she think will happen in the next 80 years?
     
  10. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Scientists find way to make mineral which can remove CO2 from atmosphere | PHYS.org

    Scientists have found a rapid way of producing magnesite, a mineral which stores carbon dioxide. If this can be developed to an industrial scale, it opens the door to removing CO2 from the atmosphere for long-term storage, thus countering the global warming effect of atmospheric CO2.

    A tonne of naturally-occurring magnesite can remove around half a tonne of CO2 from the atmosphere.
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate Change Is Cooking the Oceans | Gizmodo

    The number of marine heat wave days doubled between 1982 and 2016, and have also increased in extent and intensity.

    87 percent of marine heat waves can be attributed to climate change, meaning they would not have occurred without it.

    The research shows that if we allow the world to warm two degrees Celsius marine heat waves will increase 23 fold.

    At 3.5 degrees Celsius marine heat waves would become 41 more times likely, and the portion that would be attributed solely to humans would be upwards of 97 percent.

    The research was published in Nature.
     
  12. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    New Jersey man who contracted flesh-eating bacteria while crabbing has forearms, hands amputated, family says
    New Jersey man who contracted flesh-eating bacteria while crabbing has forearms, hands amputated, family says http://www.foxnews.com/health/2018/08/16/new-jersey-man-who-contracted-flesh-eating-bacteria-while-crabbing-has-forearms-hands-amputated-family-says.html

    I got to thinking it seems like I was hearing about this more often so I googled it. I guess there's no telling what sort of surprises are in store with the system changing like it is.

    The Link Between Climate Change and 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria
    By Kimberly Hickok, Staff Writer | August 3, 2018 01:48pm ET
    The Link Between Climate Change and 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria https://www.livescience.com/63252-climate-change-increases-vibrio-bacteria.html
     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    Location: USA

    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Climate change-driven droughts are getting hotter | Science Daily

    Available soil moisture can remove surface heat through evaporation, but if the land is dry less heat is transported away, which increases the local temperature.

    Regions undergoing droughts warmed more than four times faster than areas with average weather conditions.

    These changes point to a greater number of droughts and heat waves co-occurring. This can lead to increases in wildfires and reduced crop yields.

    The study was published in Science Advances.
     

  14. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    'Abrupt thaw' of permafrost beneath lakes could significantly affect climate change models | Science Daily

    Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new study. Unlike shallow, gradual thawing of terrestrial permafrost, the abrupt thaw beneath thermokarst lakes is irreversible this century. Even climate models that project only moderate warming this century will have to factor in their emissions, according to the researchers.

    Existing models currently attribute about 20 percent of the permafrost carbon feedback this century to methane, with the rest due to carbon dioxide from terrestrial soils. By including thermokarst lakes, methane becomes the dominant driver, responsible for 70 to 80 percent of permafrost carbon-caused warming this century. Adding thermokarst methane to the models makes the feedback's effect similar to that of land-use change, which is the second-largest source of human-made warming.

    The study was published in the journal Nature Communications.
     
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