Ocean News

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by ImaginaryNumber, Oct 8, 2015.

  1. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

  2. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Economic models significantly underestimate climate change risks | London School of Economics

    Policymakers are being misinformed by the results of economic models that underestimate the future risks of climate change impacts, according to a new paper
    published in the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy.

    They warn that the "integrated assessment models" used by economists "largely ignore the potential for 'tipping points' beyond which impacts accelerate, become unstoppable, or become irreversible." As a result "they inadequately account for the potential damages from climate change, especially at moderate to high levels of warming," due to rises in global mean temperature of more than 2 Celsius degrees.

    The authors draw attention to "a major discrepancy between scientific and economic estimates of the impacts of unmanaged future climate change." They state: "These discrepancies between the physical and the economic impact estimates are large, and they matter. However, physical impacts are often not translated into monetary terms and they have largely been ignored by climate economists."
     
  3. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Global warming may be twice what climate models predict | University of New South Wales
     
  4. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Melting Permafrost Emits More Methane Than Scientists Thought | Eco Watch

    Methane is reckoned to be at least 30 times more powerful than CO2 at warming the earth, with some estimates putting its potency much higher still. The good news, research has suggested, is that there is far less methane than CO2 in the atmosphere to worry about.

    The bad news, announced by an international research team, is that previous calculations may have been seriously wrong, and that thawing permafrost is likely to be producing appreciably more methane than anyone had thought....

    Methane and carbon dioxide are both produced in thawing permafrost as dead animal and plant remains decompose. But methane is formed only in the absence of oxygen. Until now, scientists had also thought that more greenhouse gases were formed when the ground was dry and well aerated—in other words, when oxygen was available.

    So they did not expect much methane to be produced by the thawing permafrost. What Dr. Knoblauch and his colleagues have now shown is that water-saturated permafrost soils without oxygen can be twice as harmful to the climate as dry soils—which means the role of methane has been greatly underestimated....
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Red-hot planet: All-time heat records have been set all over the world during the past week | Washington Post

    • Northern Siberia model analyses showed temperatures soaring 40 degrees above normal on July 5

    • Ouargla, Algeria 124.3 degrees, surpassing Africa’s previous highest reliable temperature measurement of 123.3 degrees

    • The University of California Los Angeles set its all-time high-temperature of 111 degrees on July 6

    • Denver tied its all-time high-temperature record of 105 degrees on June 28

    • Mount Washington, N.H., tied its all-time warmest low temperature of 60 degrees on July 2.

    • Burlington, VT, set its all-time warmest low temperature ever recorded of 80 degrees on July 2

    • Montreal recorded its highest temperature in recorded history, dating back 147 years, of 97.9 degrees on July 2

    • Glasgow, Scotland had its hottest day on record, hitting 89.4 degrees

    • Belfast, Ireland hit 85.1 degrees (29.5 Celsius) on June 28, its all-time record

    • Tbilisi, Georgia: On July 4, the capital city soared to 104.9 degrees, its all-time record.

    • Yerevan, Armenia: On July 2, the capital city soared to 107.6 degrees, a record high for July and tying its record for any month.

    • Several locations in southern Russia topped or matched their warmest June temperatures on record on the 28th.

    • Quriyat, Oman, posted the world’s hottest low temperature ever recorded on June 28: 109 degrees (42.6 Celsius).

    • In April, Pakistan posted the hottest temperature ever observed on Earth during the month of 122.4 degrees
     
  6. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    'Zero tolerance' plan eyed for plastic pollution

    Governments are being asked to move towards a legal treaty banning plastic waste from entering the sea.

    Delegates in Nairobi preparing the way for the UN's environment ministers meeting next week are said to be in broad agreement on the need for tougher action to combat the plastics crisis.

    One idea is to mirror the model of the Paris climate agreement.

    'Zero tolerance' plan for plastic pollution https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-42190678


    Hey, censorship for the U.S.A.! This ought to make it easier for deniers.



    You can watch it here if you want...

    World Environment Day: 'Our world is swamped by plastic'
    Eight million tonnes of plastic dumped into oceans each year, killing marine life and entering the human food chain.

    World Environment Day: 'Our world is swamped by plastic' https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/06/world-environment-day-world-swamped-plastic-180605144524487.html


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  7. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    The Northwest’s orcas are starving and disappearing. Can they be saved? | The News Tribune

    For the last three years, not one calf has been born to the dwindling pods of black-and-white killer whales spouting geysers of mist off the coast of the Pacific Northwest. Normally four or five calves would be born each year among the urban population of whales — pods named J, K and L. But most recently, the number of orcas has dwindled to just 75, a 30-year-low in what seems to be an inexorable, perplexing decline.

    Listed as endangered since 2005, the orcas essentially are starving, as their primary prey, the Chinook salmon, are dying off....

    The recent agreement between the Canadian government and Kinder Morgan to expand the Trans Mountain Pipeline would multiply oil tanker traffic through the orcas’ habitat by seven times, according to some estimates, and expose them to excessive noise and potential spills. Construction is set to begin in August, despite opposition from Governor Inslee and many environmentalists....

    Of most concern are the lingering effects of chemicals and pesticides, including the now banned DDT, as well as PCBs and PPDE, widely used in flame retardants and found through the world. The pollutants accumulate in salmon as they feed, and when the whales eat salmon they also ingest PCBs at even higher levels. “It’s very lipophilic, which means it stays in the fat, and the females transfer a huge proportion of the contaminant burden to their offspring,” Hanson said. “About 85 percent gets transferred to calves through lactation.”...
     
  8. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    That Pacific Ocean garbage patch is close by so everything gets to eat plenty of that. Plus maybe this might make a tiny contribution to the problem....



    7 years later, still feeling around in the dark. That doesn't bode well.
    Plus there is all the other pollutants of oil, chemicals, and toxic waste that were flushed into the Pacific with the tsunami.


    .
     
  9. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    [​IMG]
    Fukushima radiation has reached U.S. shores https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/tech/science/environment/2016/12/07/fukushima-radiation-has-reached-us-shores/95045692/

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  10. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Ice-free Arctic summers could hinge on small climate warming range | Science Daily

    The findings, which were published in the journal Nature Climate Change, show that limiting warming to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 degrees Celsius) would reduce the likelihood of an ice-free Arctic summer to 30 percent by the year 2100, whereas warming by 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) would make at least one ice-free summer certain.

    "I didn't expect to find that half a degree Celsius would make a big difference, but it really does," said Alexandra Jahn, author of the study and an assistant professor in CU Boulder's Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and a fellow in the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR). "At 1.5 degrees Celsius, half of the time we stay within our current summer sea ice regime whereas if we reach 2 degrees of warming, the summer sea ice area will always be below what we have experienced in recent decades."
     
  11. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Global warming to date could ‘obliterate’ a third of glacier ice | Eco Business

    The warming the world has already experienced could be enough to melt more than a third of the world’s glaciers outside Antarctica and Greenland – regardless of current efforts to reduce emissions.

    That is the stark conclusion of a new study, which analyses the lag between global temperature rise and the retreat of glaciers. The relatively slow response of glaciers to global warming means it will take to the end of the century – and beyond – to see the benefits of mitigation efforts in the coming decades.
     
  12. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    That doesn't bode well. It seems in the West we're at the end of a relatively long term plan to convert people to short term thinking.
     
  13. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Rising Levels of Carbon Dioxide Causing Fish to Lose Their Sense of Smell | Telesur

    The carbon dioxide when absorbed by seawater, forms carbonic acid which is responsible for making the water more acidic. According to the research, fish use their "sense of smell (olfaction) to find food, safe habitats, avoid predators, recognize each other and find suitable spawning grounds" but a reduction in their ability to smell is adversely affecting these essential functions necessary for their survival.

    The new study states that several economically important species will be affected by the elevated levels of CO2. The sense of smell of sea bass was reduced by up to half in seawater that was acidified with a level of CO2 predicted for the end of the century.
     
  14. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member


  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    China could face deadly heat waves due to climate change | MIT News

    A region that holds one of the biggest concentrations of people on Earth could be pushing against the boundaries of habitability by the latter part of this century, a new study shows.

    Research has shown that beyond a certain threshold of temperature and humidity, a person cannot survive unprotected in the open for extended periods — as, for example, farmers must do. Now, a new MIT study shows that unless drastic measures are taken to limit climate-changing emissions, China’s most populous and agriculturally important region could face such deadly conditions repeatedly, suffering the most damaging heat effects, at least as far as human life is concerned, of any place on the planet.

    The study shows that the risk of deadly heat waves is significantly increased because of intensive irrigation in this relatively dry but highly fertile region, known as the North China Plain — a region whose role in that country is comparable to that of the Midwest in the U.S. That increased vulnerability to heat arises because the irrigation exposes more water to evaporation, leading to higher humidity in the air than would otherwise be present and exacerbating the physiological stresses of the temperature.

     
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