ocean conditions are changing due to Rapid Global Climate Shift

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Boston, Jan 10, 2011.

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  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    Thanks, PDW. Now everyone knows. The "as if" was to imply "As if Obama would let QE2 share space on his submarine.", but thanks anyway.

    Please name the valley so I can check your claim. Many valleys lie at the foot of Mt. Wellington.
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    The Great Lakes were once dry until global warming inundated them with the melt-off from glaciers, and I mean big ones.
     
  3. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Welcome to our eclectic forum, UnderseaHunter :)

    I've heard of the DOC and magnetic pole flip-flopping, but I haven't heard of Crustal Displacement Theory. It's great to have one more thing to worry about. ;)

    edit:
    According to the Wikipedia article on the Polar Shift Hypothesis we may not need to worry too much about 500' tsunami waves.
     
  4. underseahunter
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    underseahunter New Member

    Pole Shift vs. Crustal Displacement Theory

    Right. One more than huge thing to worry about, I agree.

    The overarching point is that the MAGNETIC Pole is indeed shifting. These "survivalist preppers" worry about something that happens every 50,000 years or so naturally. Just adjust compass and carry on, as I paraphrased the Queen of England.

    These so called preppers do not realize what the implications of the original theory from a 1960's or 1970's book called "Pole Shift" was however. It is not the Magnetic Pole Shifting as much as it is the Crust Shifting above the poles.

    The molten nickel iron core of the Earth rotates, and thereby generates the magnetic field that our compasses read. The REAL thing that the magnetic field of the Earth does is to protect us from bombardment of cosmic radiation. Seen in action as the Aurora Borealis and it's southern sister. Crops would mutate, phytoplankton would be wiped out too. Take a peek at Mars, he used to have a molten core of iron that cooled, stopped rotating, and allowed the atmosphere and the (theoretical) oceans of mars to be BOILED away by cosmic radiation, and by proxy any (theoretical) life forms mutated to death...

    Now IF the Crust Shifts around the molten core, yes the magnetic poles will shift above it, but imagine the oceanic displacement of the crust rapidly shifting, the oceans will pile up, hence the GLOBAL 500 foot tsunamis.

    Keep Calm and Carry on.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    If you are referring to Charles Hapgood's two books The Earth's Shifting Crust and Path of the Pole, it appears that his ideas have not been substantiated by earth scientists, and are not considered to be a valid model of how the earth works. Therefore my comment that one doesn't need to worry too much about 500' tsunamis generated by a general shift of the earth's crust.

     
  6. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    your right 52% to 48%? average
     
  7. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    The Grand Canyon was cut out by water. The water isnt there now so why surprise if it came back.
     
  8. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    the earth is constantly changing, its just that mans view is from a tiny time line of the history of the earth
     
  9. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Obama did better than the winners of 28 of the last 48 Presidential elections (in the nine before that, the popular vote wasn't recorded; just the Electoral College vote).

    So yes, I guess you could say the margin was average or a touch better. It wasn't a landslide -- but it was a quite respectable win, not a squeaker.

    Now what say we give politics a rest in this thread? If you'd like, I'll certainly discuss them in PM's or email to your heart's content.... I always welcome a genuine give and take on the subject.:)
     
  10. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Yes but some of it can be quite frightening . Imagine if Tasmamia were to re connect to Australia again and Tazzies could just walk across.

    Oh Oh what if it re connected with New Zealand ----OMG

    I just hope America is well anchored. I imagine that lot dritfing up the channel looking for social security.
     
  11. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - we Canadians have it well anchored Frosty. Wouldn't have mentioned it but I didn't want you spending any more sleepless nights . . .
     
  12. bntii
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    bntii Senior Member

    This is a common thrust when approaching possible effect of mans activities.
    Well traveled ground when arguing changes to large systems such as fish stocks, level of pollutants in the water, atmosphere, seas.

    The carbon cycle does experience changes over long time scales.
    One might look at the inputs which can be attributed to man when addressing how our activities may effect this system.
    These might include cement processing and burning of fossil fuels which took several hundred million years to 'sequester', and are being released into the atmosphere in a few short decades.

    At this point it is inarguable that we have changed the carbon cycle in regards to the quantity of atmospheric carbon. What remains is gaining an understanding of how that change might effect the heat retention in the atmosphere which will in turn effect the planetary climate.

    If this effect is measurable, our activities have in fact changed our planet over a time scale which is far shorter than those we can observe through the geologic record for these events in the past.
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    They were making a big thing on the news today about how the carbon level is rising three times faster than they expected, and around 80% of it was China.

    I cant point the finger though - a lot of that would have been coal from Australia.

    Thinking about it, I cant see everyone stopping driving and not using electricity, so perhaps we had better start thinking about pulling the carbon dioxide out of the air. Scattering nutrients on the ocean, causing plankton to breed prolifically was one way of sequestering CO2 quickly.

    maybe we should all carry a bag of fertilizer out to sea when we go sailing, to spread on the water ?
     
  14. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    My personal opinion is that climate change is well on its way, and no one is going to get the whole world together enough to stop it. So we need to start looking at what the changes will be, and how we're going to survive them with the least damage....
     

  15. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    What makes the concept of man made climate change controversial is the cost to adapt.

    Rich countries will easily adapt and poor countries are going to demand that the rich countries hand over the cash to help them fix their problem. ..you broke it ,now fix my problems.

    This will be controversial. Already many poor countries are lining up for handouts.
     
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