Newbie wanting tips on "Bug out boat"

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Tyrfing, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. Tyrfing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Long Island, NY

    Tyrfing New Member

    Hello Ladies and Gents,

    I am new here, and new to the boating world.
    In honesty, I haven't really even entered it yet.

    I live with my family on Long Island, NY and our experience during Hurricane Sandy, and recent experiences from the hurricanes in the south have convinced me I need a boat to get off Long Island if SHTF.

    I have 2 options that I am looking into :

    - A boat to cross the sound to Connecticut - This is fairly straight forward and basically any boat would do. This is however my backup option.

    - A boat to bug out to Maine, where I'm planning to buy a "Bug out location"
    This will require a completely different boat as the distance is between 320-520 miles depending on where on the coast of Maine I want to go.

    So my question is, what type of boat, that is not outrageously expensive has the range to manage this trip without refueling? (Carrying extra fuel onboard is ok..)

    And what else should I think about planning a boat ride of that distance?

    Best,

    Daniel
     
  2. Nick.K
    Joined: May 2011
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    Nick.K Senior Member

    Do I read you correctly?
    You are completely new to the boating world. You are looking for a boat to set to sea with your family on a trip of up to 500 miles in the face of an impending hurricane for the purpose of escape?
     
  3. Tyrfing
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    Tyrfing New Member

    LoL it sounds pretty crazy when you put it like that :p

    But, yes if push comes to shove.

    However, I would like to use the boat for fishing, so of course do some sort of course on seamanship etc.. I wasn't planning on going from 0 to hero in the blink of an eye :D
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    What you need is some boating experence first, so you can make reasonable decisions about a sea going vessel. Any modest craft can make this tip,with a well seasoned skipper at the helm. A novice will find a way to drown everyone aboard in the finest of boats.
     
  5. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber An Imaginary Member

    Maybe a lifeboat would be a good choice for an inexperienced person who must weather a hurricane --

    [​IMG]

    But boats work best if kept away from rocky shores, which Maine has in abundance. So maybe your landing craft should be a Zorb Ball --

    [​IMG]
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    What you need is a car to drive West, instead of a boat to sail into a hurricane.
     
  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    "Bugging out" on a boat is a bit like camping. It takes a lot of organisation, unexpected expense and a lot of bother. I bet a fair few of the hulks blown up against the rocks of Miami were "escape machines" for the owners. Remembering the lack of fuel and the traffic chaos just before the hurricanes, having a boat might seem like a good idea, but if you have to fight high winds at sea, that might be problematic. Perhaps a 25ft+ solid, heavy sea-worthy boat to hold family and gear, with a reliable engine might be a good start. Now, you have to find a place to moor it, and pay marina expenses .......
     
  8. Tyrfing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Tyrfing New Member

    Of course that is part of the plan.

    Proper Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

    That is why I'm starting this journey here by asking people with experience.
    Step two is to do some sourt of course/certification
    Step three is to buy a appropriate boat
    Step four is to use the boat for fishing and holiday trips to build experience.

    THEN I would consider myself ready..
     
  9. Tyrfing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Long Island, NY

    Tyrfing New Member

    Very funny.

    I'm not intending to wait until a hurricane hits. There is always several days warning, especially living on Long Island. Hurricanes doesn't magically appear at the coast. So I would bug out well ahead of that storm arriving.
     
  10. Tyrfing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Tyrfing New Member

    Well that is the problem, in the event of a disaster, Long Island is a "death trap". Only a few bridges to leave the island, and in the event of an emergency, especially if in conjunction with armed conflict/terrorist attack those egress routes will be blocked.
    I lived through 13 days without electricity after Hurricane Sandy, I've already seen what happens..

    Travelling North with a boat does not take me into a hurricane, it takes me away from it.
     
  11. Tyrfing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Tyrfing New Member

    Thank you for the first serious reply.

    I know exactly what you mean, but we live fairly close to the North Shore of Long Island, so to get down to the water won't be a problem.

    Ideally I would like a boat I can keep on my property on a trailer so I'm able to launch the boat where and when I choose to.

    Any idea of what kind of boat would fit that category? Able to be trailered, long range and seaworthy?
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Montreal is nice during hurricane season. I live on the water in Florida and I chose to bug out in my truck. Gasoline was very hard to come by so I filled up truck and spare tanks days before departure. Those spare tanks got me home as there was no gas to be had south of Tallahassee. My wife was able to fill up in Tallahassee with the 30 buck max purchase but 30 was inadequate for the truck for the return trip. The next day I went to buy an additional 20 at the same station but the pumps were dry.
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    As for the skiff, I trailered it to Tallahassee. Had we stayed home, the eye would have missed us by 40 miles instead to 20.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    C'mon , Tyrfing, enough of the "bug-out" mentality, you should be thinking of how having a boat where you live could assist those in need of help in such an emergency !:) I should add that in my part of the world, the only time I ever heard of a "bug-out" was in reference to the Korean War. o_O
     

  15. Tyrfing
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Tyrfing New Member

    My first priority will always to get my family to safety. Anyone questioning that motive can respectfully go play with themselves. :p
     
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