Newbie trying to ID a sailboat

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by rehenry, Apr 15, 2010.

  1. rehenry
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Iowa

    rehenry New Member

    Hi everyone, this is my first post but I have been lurking around for a while. My question is can anyone identify this sailboat. I found it on the web, but for the life of me have never been able to find it again or identify it myself. Any ideas from anyone? Looks like a really interesting small sailboat.

    Thanks
    Roy
     

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  2. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    It's a Halman 20', built by Halman Manufacturing Company in Beamsville, Ontario. LOA is 19'8", LWL is 16'6", beam is 7'9", draft 2'10" and displacement 2500 pounds. Sail area about 200 sq ft.
     
  3. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    An earlier builder...EXE Fibercraft Ltd of Exeter Ontario called it the Nordica 20, there was also a 16' and a larger version 29'11". All three were designed by Mr. B. Malta-Mueller in the strong double-ended Scandinavian style.
     
  4. rehenry
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Iowa

    rehenry New Member

    Thanks

    Thanks for replying so quickly, you guys are good.
    -Roy
     
  5. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member

    This place is a motherlode of both general and specific information. It never ceases to amaze me, and the members are very good about sharing what they know.

    Sometimes I get the feeling that if I could just figure out the right questions to ask, I could learn everything there is to know about boats here. Well, everything except hands-on experience, of course.
     
  6. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Right on Troy. There are some really smart people who hang around this site. Disclaimer: I certainly do not consider myself to be equal to the bright ones. We have intellect from all over the world. The Aussies and the Kiwis are very much into this stuff, although there are one or two of 'em that are nut cases. (stonedpirate hello) We get good and qualified info from people from Italy, Sweden, S. Africa, Japan and many, many elsewheres, of course Canada and the US too.. Sweet!

    We have screen names like Willoughby, Guellermo, Speer, etc, who are authorities in their specialties. Too many most worthy contributors to name. We have subscribers who have seamanship experience of the most respected kind. Some of the Alaskans can tell us some wild sea stories, people like Stumble can fill us in on some serious realities. Dammit we have lost one of our good ones. Par if you are out there, we miss you. We have some comedians too. They provide a bit of levity.

    To all, I thank you sincerely for your selfless contributions. And to all of the newbies....pay attention, most of these guys are good.
     
  7. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Not to split hairs or argue (don't care enough) but I'm sure it's a Nordica.

    A friend had a Nordica ~15 years ago,the Halman he was going to buy had smaller side windows which he didn't like.
     
  8. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    WOW, Nice to be included with some of those guys!

    I figure for every thing I post here I learn 10. I consider this a great source of information on a lot of areas I have never experienced. Which is why I keep coming back.
     
  9. rehenry
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: Iowa

    rehenry New Member

    Excellent

    I didn't think I would get such detailed replies. I also didn't think that I would meet such friendly people. You guys rock! BTW, I'm still interested in the Nordica 20. What a cool looking boat.

    Thanks
    -Roy
     
  10. Scunthorp
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Halifax

    Scunthorp Hull Tech

    I own one so if there is anymore interest drop me a line.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I which I'd seen this thread when it came up, as some designs just stick out like sore thumbs, like this one. It's a Nordica 20 and as has been previously noted the Halman, which was built after the Nordica, had smaller ports and a cut back fore foot. It's keel was changed fairly significantly, for reduced draft (presumably). There were other notable differences between the two versions of this design.
     
  12. Scunthorp
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 122
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    Location: Halifax

    Scunthorp Hull Tech

    In order to make her increasingly Blue water oriented I up graded the through
    hulls to 1 ½" In order to make her increasingly Blue water oriented I up graded the through
    hulls to 1 ½" (Think of a Bath tub and how slow it is to drain) There were four
    serious points to note 1 was I used two hole cutters one the size of the
    original hole and the other the size of the required hole this allowed for
    little to no error or slipping. The hull is about just a tad under ¼" thick in
    this location. I fabricated the washers with hole saws (1 ½ and 4" by ¼" thick)
    you could use the polymer Delrin which is very stiff as it contains 30%
    fibreglass (the good plastic through hulls are made of this and also the sheaves
    in mort modern pulleys.) to bed the through hulls in I used Secoflex 229 I had
    3m 5200 which is normally what I would use but I can and do get a great Navy
    deal on the Secoflex and it is bomb proof.. I cut off the ribbed pipe portion
    of the through hull as this seriously reduces the diameter of the system and
    therefore its effectiveness. When cutting the cockpit holes I used the through
    hull to get my 2'' circle and then used a die grinder on the cockpit sole (I was
    worried about how much meat was there but it turns out to be plenty.) I didn't
    cross the hoses as I have found this to be ineffective I used the white san hose
    (I bought the black but it was a pure nightmare trying to get it on the white
    hose you can heat a little and lube with Vaseline and it flies on) I used
    industrial strength 316 SS hose Clamps which are wider and stronger than most
    people use, I have soft wooden plugs tied to the Valves just in case. Points to
    note she drains when underway I was a little surprised when I through down my
    first bucket of water as it went nowhere but after my fist sail I have had no
    problems (expectations and reality) I am now focused on the main hatch which on
    my boat is a peace of plywood I am going to make it ridiculously strong why
    not?? If you have any further questions or need clarification don't hesitate
    to ask Sincerely John
     

  13. Scunthorp
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 122
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    Location: Halifax

    Scunthorp Hull Tech

    Sailed mine to Shelburne and back this year from Halifax good times. They are a small sailboat but you can trust them in a blow. I hit a bad gale on the way home and had to run for it. The boat was bombproof.
     

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