new to boats-is older boat ok?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by hannahsmom, May 3, 2005.

  1. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    I would love some general advice and directions to good sites/books. We are VERY new to boats- we planned on saving up for a newer boat but have fallen for a 1977 Searay 24" flybridge (I think it's real name is sedan?) that just seems right for our family. We have two younger kids (7&9) and a baby- so cuddy cabin, kitchenette, and enclosed head are all must haves. I love to fish- my husband is indifferent but willing to humor me to stay in sunny california. So... Is this a practical boat? I can do some re-finishing if I can find some good sources- he is pretty good with motors- 1st thing would be to replace engine for my peace of mind. Sorry this is so long- I just don't know where to start- any input would be helpful. Thanks Kathy
     
  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 4,127
    Likes: 146, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2043
    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Sounds like you've already done a decent job of separating your needs from your wants, and figuring out what you're after.
    You say this boat seems 'just right for your family'. From what I've seen, this size and class of boat is a fairly popular family overnighter, and people certainly get out on them a lot more than with the bigger boats in my area. Before committing yourself, I'd take a very close look at other new and used boats in this size and class, and look at other makes. You'll get a better feel for the quality of your prospective boat and might find something that suits you even better.
    When you think you've found one, put your feelings aside and look over the boat. Bring an objective friend, or better still, a registered marine surveyor. Don't restrict yourself to what you can see. Poke your head under consoles, open all the access panels to the bilge, look at the seams between parts from inside. Look for corrosion, sub-par wiring, signs of overstressed joints, signs of shoddy construction, signs of wear. Look at the hull bottom for signs of impact damage, hasty repair, delamination or blistering. You say you'd replace the motor; if you can afford it, go right ahead as a new motor will undoubtedly be more efficient and reliable than one with 28 years on the clock. You should also consider what else needs to be done to bring an old boat up to your standards. Being in California you will likely be boating in the Pacific- you'll need to add appropriate safety gear, a DSC VHF radio, piles of lifejackets, etc. (A little note about that- what's required by law in the USA and what you actually need are very different. Look up SOLAS and Canadian Coast Guard minimum standards for safety gear, as well as US Coast Guard ones.)
    Boats aren't cheap. (I've often heard themn described as 'holes in the water surrounded by fibreglass, into which one pours money'.) But they are fun, and if well-built will last forever. Refitting an old used boat is a great way to get into the game.
    Happy boating!
     
  3. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    At the risk of sending you to another forum and going to the section on reviews which is moderated by the most knowledgeable woman for digging out what boat and model has ANY recalls or owner negatives or positives. Look up your future boat. She also lists recalls and how much $$ owners had to pay. You will know her on sight at a meeting. She is the ONLY one there with a halo over her head.-----------------------------site is www.BoatUS.com --then boater to boater--then message boards---then consumer affairs. She is very good!
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2005
  4. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    Asking is a older boat O K ? Is like asking is a older man or woman O K ?
     
  5. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    how about "experienced boat" and, well, inexperienced owner??
     
  6. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    my husband and a friend are going over to look under the hood and kick some proverbial tires right now. The price is great compared to what we can find on the internet, but the owner is selling through e-bay and doesn't want to stop the auction- right now it's at 3500 and we don't think it will go beyond 5000 (he sold it last month for 4300 on ebay but the buyer fell through- don't ask why he wants to sell it this way again) It's right down the street from us in Aptos Ca., but we won't get to test drive(float?) it. That in itself is kinda scaring us off the deal- we will see what our boating friend has to say- I really like the layout and look of the boat- if I had any web savvy I'd include the ebay link. No matter what, thank you all for your help- I found great forums and websites through you-
     
  7. woodboat
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 312
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 14
    Location: Baltimore MD, USA

    woodboat Senior Member

    is this it? http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=31271&item=4546355064&rd=1 At least it has a merc. Some had OMC.
    I personally would prefer this http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=31271&item=4547026587&rd=1 I like inboards as they are more reliable which is important for someone new to boating. In general I/Os (inboard/outboard] are faster and trimable but tend to need more maintenance and they have issues like tearing the boot. Of course my favorite boat in that size range is this http://www.yachtworld.com/core/list...rency=USD&access=Public&listing_id=54950&url= It's aluminum construction means no stringer rot, transom rot, blisters or delamination all things of concern with older fiberglass.
     
  8. yokebutt
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 545
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 15
    Location: alameda CA

    yokebutt Boatbuilder

    Hannahsmom,
    You should at the very least have a reputable mechanic look over and test-run the engine and drive, they tend to live a hard life in a boat and are expensive to fix.

    Yokebutt.
     
  9. woodboat
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 312
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 14
    Location: Baltimore MD, USA

    woodboat Senior Member

    I would tend to agree yokebutt except the original post suggested that the engine would be replaced regardless of it's condition.
     
  10. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    Yep- thats it on the ebay link- since the motor is older and with three young kids I want something reliable, although the owner says the motor only has about 360 mile, and the listing says 700 - so my next question for all you helpful folks is... is there a place like carfax.com where I can look up this boat's history? Do they even record accidents, incidents? It's only a few miles away, so I can go get it's registration number. but will there be nothing there other than name and address?
    At this time I am looking at this as a learning how to buy process- by the time we got it together to go with our mechanically inclined boat friend after work yesterday it was getting dark, so we resceduled for this afternoon. We do have some engine experience- we've got a 49 chevy 3/4 ton pickup that my husband tinkers with weekends.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2005
  11. woodboat
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 312
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 14
    Location: Baltimore MD, USA

    woodboat Senior Member

    I recommend a surveyor. Usually the sale is written so that you can back out if it fails a survey and pending a sea trial. A survey will find minor repairs obviously and I would stop a sale for minor issues. I would however stop it for rotten stringers or if I intended to keep the engine a bad one. With that said accidents are rare but sinkings are common. A survey would catch this but I would look for high water marks in the bilge or evidence of water intrusion. Water would compromise the electrical system and haunt yo for years. As far as the engine: is it raw water or fresh water cooled. If raw was it used in fresh water like a lake? Problem with raw water is the engine rust on the inside. Even fresh water engines need risers and logs (exhaust parts) replaced every 10 years or so. SO bottom line is that it iis difficult to hide major problems and an observant eye can usually pick up on it.
     
  12. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    Used boat. No ride with a surveyor and or mechanic ,drop the boat like a hot potatoe, it is trouble. He really wants a web deal. So the new owner is far far away.
     
  13. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 4,127
    Likes: 146, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2043
    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    An absolute must with buying a boat, like a car, is a full test drive and a full inspection by a pro. If the seller refuses a test run, or is wary of letting your (not his, your) surveyor study the boat, it's because there's something wrong with the boat.
    I am not aware of any registry that tracks boats like they do with cars. When you buy a used car in Ontario (not sure about the US) you receive a package including the car's ownership history, insurance branding, liens, etc. I don't think the same applies for used boats. On that note- might want to have a lawyer check the sale contract to ensure that any liens, etc. are the seller's responsibility.
     
  14. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    Marshmat. How far in miles and driving time are you from Clayton, N Y? I ask because you would be great at opening some overtrusting peoples eyes who seem to get burned for not asking the right questions before they buy that bargin. Thanks, Rich.
     

  15. hannahsmom
    Joined: May 2005
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: santa cruz ca

    hannahsmom Junior Member

    I'm agreeing - I don't like high pressure- although one of the things I like about my husband is his enduring trust in people.. It comes back to bite him sometimes. Cyclops is prob. right about web sales- sigh.. I really liked that boat, but with three kids do we need another fixer-upper? Of course, to be devil's advocate- if we don't buy cheap we will never buy- esp. in santa cruz. I will let any interested know in an hour
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.