New Product To Save Soft Decks

Discussion in 'Materials' started by vitamansea, Aug 20, 2015.

  1. vitamansea
    Joined: Aug 2015
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    vitamansea Junior Member

    There is a new product out that works really well in repairing wood core fiberglass. Its a structural expansion foam that likes moisture and envelops wood pulp, air, muck. Its amazing stuff www.injectadeck.com is where I got it.

    Chris
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It is a bad patch job. Foam cores are structural. That material will just fill the voids between rotted core and marginally adhere to the laminates. It is not a proper structural repair.
     
  3. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    WOW,

    sounds too good to be true.... I looked over the site and never saw a piece of rotted timber cored deck that had been repaired with the substance and opened to see how well it makes its way in and around the mush inside.

    From the injectadeck site.....
    "Injectadeck alleviates that issue allowing you to mix and inject thru a small hole simultaneously. While you will have to work fast filling all your holes so the product does not harden in the mixing tip. The type of foam injected is a hard and resilient structural foam that can support heavy loads with little or no collapse of the closed cell structure. Expanding six times its size it can be classified as a 12lb foam which you could dent....with a hammer. This product is attracted to moist environments, and water helps in adhesion, expansion and curing. Most boat decks are wet rotted and perfect candidates for this product. If you have dry rot when you drill your holes, lightly spray your newly perforated deck down with water and in 30 minutes, inject your deck."
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Dry rot is not because the wood is dry. It is one of those sales pitches that disregard all existing technical knowledge.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you read the description is suggests it doesn't matter the condition of the core, the condition of the skins, etc. "it'll stick anyway" is what they offer. Well, those that have repaired cores know what happens if water or anything else, has been flowing around in it for a while and having a clean surface to bond to is mandatory. This said, a lot of money can be made selling snake oil, because there's one born every day. It's the Donald Trump of core saving systems "just trust me - it'll be a Huuuge improvement".
     
  6. vitamansea
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    vitamansea Junior Member

    Skeptics...

    Here we go, yet another review by unqualified hack. To review a product you have to buy and test the product otherwise you're just another troll.
    I worked for Intermarine in Savannah building real yachts, I was also the composites supervisor for Gulfstream Aerospace, another Savannah Company you may have heard of. I'm an engineer, I work with lightweight solutions to structural problems, 30 years now.

    Aside from the Troll's "what if's", like if your floor is torn or blown thru, there is not much you can do, thats true. You add "quotes" to things that were never said, so I say you're a troll.

    For everyone else who has a basic fiberglass boat with a wood core floor of mushy plywood, this stuff really works. Anyone in the Clearwater beach area is welcome to jump up and down on the floor of my kids 1980 Mako and see for yourself. Hard as a rock after 7 months of beatings and wet decks.

    Got something better? otherwise, put up or shut up dude, noone is interested in your narrow mind reviewing stuff he has never seen or heard of. Makes you look like a fool
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2015
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Speaking of troll, your post is the very definition of what one is.

    I haven't tested this stuff and don't anticipate I will anytime soon, though maybe you can post some published data? I ask because some goo in a can, to save lots of labor would be nice and commonly is seen, as what the advertising on their site suggested - and it did say you don't need to clean anything, just pump it in, hence my trepidation. You'll also find many engineers on this sight with a similar view.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I like how they misrepresent "dry rot" as being overly dry wood. They recommend spraying water into it :rolleyes:
     
  9. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    Great job Vitaminsea, not saying the kids boat wasn't improved in it's condition but initially you've linked a supplier that has a web presence that's very light on tech specs and pictures of the actual product at work and proven within the core space.
    All the best from Jeff.
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Gonzo, I don't know the chemical composition but I'll bet it's a moisture cure polyurethane, which would make the addition of some water reasonable. My main concern is the contaminated internal surfaces on the skins bonding to the goo, without getting there and insuring it's clean and toothed up.
     
  11. vitamansea
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    vitamansea Junior Member

    Goo

    The underside of the fiberglass floor skin is not smooth and finished like the topside, it has the impression of the wood (teeth) it was laid on. (now peeled away) I've been waiting for delam, but nothing so far. These old hulls are drive em till they die around here, soft floors or water in the transom? This is a $300 way to revive a hull, if it was a 23' 1976' "potter hull" seacraft, maybe do a $3000 floor. This is a solid answer for a few years, or even more if you replace the wet pulp with foam as it rots away. It works over floor supports, as floor supports, wherever the old fiberglass skin exists. Fill it with this rock like polyurethane foam adhesive. Too hard for bedding a fuel tank tho.

    I think it's flipping amazing, where has this stuff been all my life! rescue a boat sale? hello? I'm no troll and im serious about the results.

    Yes the poly "goo" has an added chemical to make water a reactant or catalyst.
     
  12. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I sell similar products, but I would never market them for this purpose.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Rotted wooden cores will not be displaced by the foam. It may fill some voids with mediocre adhesion. However, large areas with softened and deteriorated core will not be filled.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    In other words, bodgie something up, so it can be sold ? How lovely. :)
     

  15. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Apparently more than just a troll . . .
     
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