New Plywood Deck for 42' alaskan troller.

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by sterlingboats, Apr 23, 2014.

  1. sterlingboats
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Tenakee Springs, Alaska

    sterlingboats Junior Member

    Hi, I have a contract coming up to replace the deck beams and plywood deck on a 42' commercial fishing vessel up here in Alaska. I was hoping to hear your opinions on a few things.

    The previous decks i've replaced have been on smaller fishing boats and i have used two layers of 1/2" marine ply.

    The deck beams are 4" wide 2' centers. The boat is used for ring pot fishing in the winter. So crabbing is hard of the deck.

    I am thinking three layers of 1/2" ply. covered with glass. what are your thoughts on this? Camber of deck is fairly slight so i could probably bend two layers of 3/4" but might be pushing it!

    I would like to hear your thoughts regarding Dynel fabric compared to fiberglass. It is a high wear, commercial fishing vessel deck. In southeast alaska... so pretty much as hard a life for a deck as it gets.

    thanks so much!
    Sterling Connelly Chew
    Connelly Boatworks.
    S/V Sage Harrison Butler 32' khamseen cutter. fir on oak.
     
  2. sterlingboats
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Tenakee Springs, Alaska

    sterlingboats Junior Member

    Also I was hoping you could help me estimate how much epoxy to wet out glass for a 14' x 24' deck. thickest glass possible.
     
  3. motorbike
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    Location: Beam Reach

    motorbike Senior Member

    Good questions, we use CCA pressure treated pine plywood on workboat decks, if you can bend 2 sheets of 3/4 then I would do that rather than 3 of 1/2- less work.

    For heavy use, dynel is not sufficient, its only claim to fame is its flexibility. Biax or triax is far superior but you will be using a lot of resin. Some boats are not even glassed on the deck, just paint, treated ply doesnt rot but again it all depends on the work. Looking at the wear areas on the boat will tell you what to do.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Biax and triax are not superior to Dynel, but Dynel isn't the best either, use Xynol which is hands down, twice as good at abrasion resistance and 6 times better than 'glass cloth.

    I agree the existing deck will tell you where you need to address additional abrasion protection.

    It's also important to use CCA pressure treated, as Motorbike suggested. The new stuff is CA treated and epoxy doesn't stick to this as well, but the old CCA treated stuff is still available, just not at the retail level.

    I'd also tend to not use a fabric sheathing, except in areas that really need some help, as it's just an added expense, for something that's going to get torn up in a few years anyway.

    As to the amount of fabric you need, well just cover the square footage. As to the amount of resin, well this depends on the fabric type and weight. Xynole and Dynel use about 3 times as much resin as regular cloth, maybe twice as much as biax. This resin rich material is what gives it it's abrasion durability.
     
  5. motorbike
    Joined: Mar 2011
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    motorbike Senior Member

    interesting comments on the biax/triax. Xynole would definitely be superior for abrasion but the cost? however I thought the high glass to resin ratio of the other weaves would be better value overall. That said plenty of workboats just use poolside non skid latex paint.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Dynel and Xynole cost about the same as 8 - 10 ounce (270 - 340 gsm) cloth.
     
  7. magicod
    Joined: Jul 2014
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    Location: British Columbia

    magicod New Member

    Sterling it appears we have something in common: Sage. I had her built and you now own her. It would be great to have a chat.
    Stephen
     
  8. sterlingboats
    Joined: Mar 2012
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    Location: Tenakee Springs, Alaska

    sterlingboats Junior Member

    HI! I would love to get in touch with you! I bought Sage in fairly rough condition in Sitka, Alaska. 4 years ago. She is now approaching Bristol Condition again. I have lived aboard since i bought her and currently live aboard and cruise with my girlfriend. We recently felled a nice sitka spruce tree for a new mast. New Canvas Deck, New Bullwarks. Bronze Portholes.

    Please Call or write! I am trying hard to find the boats original sailplan as the rig has been changed somewhat over the years. I would love to hear more about her builder. The Boat is exceptionally well built and has held up very well.

    My Contact info is

    Sterling Connelly Chew
    Connelly Boatworks
    (907)736-9200
    PO Box 24
    Tenakee Springs, AK 99841

    Hope to hear from you soon!
    Thanks,
     

  9. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

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