New low-cost "hardware store" racing class; input on proposed rules

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Petros, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Sailor Alan
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Gig Harbor WA

    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    How about crossed adze and calking mallet, at least unique.
     
  2. Skyak
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Skyak Senior Member

    Nice job! I am not sure I fully understand the design -is that a false floor/self draining cockpit aft? The spaces on either side of the dagger box, is that the required 'cooler' space? If yes to both, great job!

    The downside questions I have are would be about how much water is trapped in the boat after righting from a capsize -looks like it would float bow down and trap water -technique? I have an idea for a 'slosh bailer' that uses rocking to pump water out if you are interested. It is also interesting that you don't show any straight beam across the boat at the mast -is one hidden forward?

    About the class emblem, a tool feature is appropriate, must be understood in simplified form, I would nominate a clamp. A box might be appropriate since it is a box rule. I would also try to include some indication that the skipper=designer=builder which is the big accomplishment. What file format does your cutter need?
     
  3. Segler
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Issaquah/WA

    Segler Junior Member

    The Builders, a tentative Survey

    The BLUE HERON is going in the water this spring. These pictures were taken last November.

    Dunnage (NAIAD) is not done but well along and progressing nicely (see several posts back).

    Sailor Alan promises to be done by summer.

    Then there is Richard Woods' ZEST. Some question there about non-hardware-store-type components.

    And Petros, maintaining radio silence.

    Anybody else out there, building? Let's see some pictures.
     

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  4. Dunnage
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Bellevue, WA

    Dunnage Junior Member

    Skyak's Questions

    Apologies for the late reply... no excuse, just away from the forum.

    You ask very astute questions. I have attached three photos to show how I addressed them. The first picture shows the bulkhead that separates the cockpit from the bow flotation chamber. The partners are fixed to this bulkhead. My picture hides the beam you ask about and I do not have a picture that shows it; but the top 1x4 of the bulkhead is backed by a 1x3 that is glued and screwed to it from rail to rail. The resulting beam is a 'T' shape, with the top of the 'T' facing aft. Note that the partners, as shown have a temporary closure aft. The third picture shows the final configuration. Also note the diagonal brace, on each side, to the next bulkhead aft. This diagonal, plus the foredeck skin extension that is structurally a shear panel, also braces the partners in the side-to-side direction.

    The transom? Well it was just unfinished as I showed it. It will have two drain flaps (a pair of swing check valves, essentially) that are normally held shut by a bit of elastic shock cord, but are released to dump water whenever needed. The second picture attached shows the framework for the flaps, mostly complete. The flaps will be made from 5mm plywood. The top half of each opening will be fixed in place (silicone adhesive caulk). The bottom half of the opening will be the moving flap that is hinged at the top. The hinge is a strip of fabric (canvas) glued all along the top edge; like piano hinge, but made from fabric.

    The floor is a foam sandwich; 5mm plywood top and bottom bonded to 1" closed cell polystyrene builder's foam board. It provides great stiffness and also gives about two cubic feet of displacement flotation.
     

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  5. Dunnage
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Bellevue, WA

    Dunnage Junior Member

    More Answers

    Stencil cutter: The Scan-n-cut stencil cutter uses *.fcm format files. I have no idea what format that is. My wife (her machine... not mine) uses a web application at //scanncutcanvas.brother.com to build the template. So I suppose the format is something from Canvas, assuming that the legacy Canvas graphics program is somehow related to this web application.

    Swamped boat recovery: Well, the front five feet of the hull is entirely sealed. ( I plan to add a water tight inspection port in the bulkhead panel.) I think, just guessing, that the boat will float slightly bow-up when swamped. I also think there will be a manageable amount of water in the cockpit once the transom flaps ate opened. I plan to put 1" holes in the bulkhead panel for the bulkhead between the aft cockpit and the sections athwart the c.b. case. The section forward of the c.b. case, where the mast step is, will need to be bailed... perhaps 1.5 cu. ft. of volume. If it proves problematic I can put a pair of holes in the bulkhead at the front of the c.b. case too... that would reduce the amount of water I need to bail by about half. The remainder would be trapped and still need to be bailed. Once I get the boat moving again, the transom flaps will mostly empty the cockpit without bailing. I have previously owned and sailed a 5o5, and transom flaps did a very effective job there.
     
  6. Dunnage
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Bellevue, WA

    Dunnage Junior Member

    Note:

    It is obvious that there is no such thing as "too many clamps" in ones tool stash... I like a C-Clamp for a symbol. Possibly a C-Clamp, with the screw thread part oriented down, followed by a dash and 600. It would look sort of like C-600 and would also symbolize the $600 challenge part of the design and build.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2016
  7. Dunnage
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Bellevue, WA

    Dunnage Junior Member

    Elvstrom Bailer

    In case anyone noticed, in the starboard side of Naiad's aft cockpit there is a well in the floor for an Elvstrom siphon bailer. The 'inside parts' of one are placed into the well for a fit check. This is just provisioning for one possible future for the boat. Initially there will be no cut-out in the hull skin for the bailer, and no bailer. Why no bailer? Well, on eBay they cost about $100 each... used. Not affordable within the $600 budget. But... they really work, and if they were affordable within the budget having one would be almost indispensable.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2016
  8. Dunnage
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Bellevue, WA

    Dunnage Junior Member

    Foam-board Sandwich Floor

    While I am at it, doing all this posting, I thought someone may be interested in how I built the floor of the cockpit. The hull was built and skinned before starting the sandwich construction of the cockpit floor. Next I installed (glued in place) 3/4" x 1" 'floors' spaced one foot apart starting at the transom and going forward. Then I glued down the foam. I painted Titebond III onto both surfaces with two coats on the wood skin... one slightly thinned coat first to penetrate the wood pores, then when the first coat was tacky I added a thin coat of the 'straight stuff'. I clamped each foam panel using 25 lb. lead bricks for the clamping force... very convenient to have some of these, but shot bags or sand bags would also do. Then I sealed the edges all around and glued down the top plywood layer after a lot of careful measuring and cutting. (I NEVER imagined how much more difficult a V-bottom would be compared to a flat bottom. There are no constant angles and very few truly straight lines. But, now that it is done, I am glad I did it.) I 'clamped the top sheet of plywood using every heavy weight I had in the shop... including some old barbell weights and the machine vice from my drill press. I also screwed the floor skin to the 'floors' with pan head screws for added clamping, taking them out later and filling the holes. The floor is really strong and stiff and light weight. All good things...
     

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  9. macbeath
    Joined: Jul 2015
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    Location: Seattle

    macbeath Junior Member

    Nice work!

    I know Peter built his hull, but I don't know what progress he's made since then.
     
  10. Segler
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Issaquah/WA

    Segler Junior Member

    Thank you, macbeath.

    When are you going to start building?
     
  11. macbeath
    Joined: Jul 2015
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    macbeath Junior Member

    Not before this summer, and possibly not this year. I'm having to move, and the person I'm supposed to be subleasing from for my bookstore seems to have some major differences with the owner of the building, so my business isn't stable enough. I'm still fiddling with designs, trying to find the simplest and most practical boat to build and own while still being competitive. I'm confident I can build fairly quickly if I find the time and the space, but with so many things unresolved, it looks like I'll be a spectator this year. That's a major disappointment, but at least I get to look at some interesting boats the rest of you are building.
     
  12. Segler
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Issaquah/WA

    Segler Junior Member

    The Blue Heron

    Now fully rigged and getting ever closer to launch. I don't like this particular jib and will make another one. Looking to May.

    Notice the yuloh auxiliary power system.
     

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  13. macbeath
    Joined: Jul 2015
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    Location: Seattle

    macbeath Junior Member

    She's a beaut!
     
  14. Segler
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Issaquah/WA

    Segler Junior Member

    Launch

    On May 2nd, 2016 the BLUE HERON, designed and built to Hardware Store Class rules, took to the water.

    ...With a little help from my friends.

    In a very light westerly breeze in the East Channel of Lake Washington. Dunnage went out with me. Also on hand our chase boat, an Etchells. Needless to say we did the chasing.

    On this first outing some things worked well, some not so much.

    The centerline floatation tank was a mistake. It severely obstructs mobility in the cockpit, particularly for the crew. Similarly, the mainsheet ratchet block, mounted just behind the centerboard trunk, really got in the way.

    On the positive side, the white polytarp sails worked well and the balance of sails, centerboard and rudder was right on.

    Also of note, the hull, with its narrow waterline beam, turned out to be very tender. Maybe extremely so. But it also was moving quite easily though the water and I am hoping for a performance for stability trade-off. Remains to be seen.

    In the meantime, we are back in the shop for some major mods. $500 so far.
     

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  15. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Congratulations!

    Your crew will find it more comfortable if he faces backwards. You can take the mainsheet direct from the boom, its the same purchase

    RW
     
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