New concept or DOA?

Discussion in 'Electric Propulsion' started by Luposian, Sep 25, 2019.

?

Do you think this concept has any validity?

Poll closed Oct 25, 2019.
  1. Amazing idea! Now, just gotta figure out HOW to refine it.

    1 vote(s)
    50.0%
  2. It's a good idea, in concept, but it's already been tried and didn't work well.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. It's a failed (DOA) concept that no one would be dumb enough to even try.

    1 vote(s)
    50.0%
  4. Um, how does this actually work?

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Luposian
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Sierra Vista, AZ

    Luposian Junior Member

    I've been trying to figure out a way to have the functionality of an electric I/O, without any possibility of water intrusion in the transom. Impossible, right? An outboard is really the only way, right?

    But after looking at my rough draft of an idea, maybe you, too, will see it's potential... or maybe not. It's crude in design, but it's the "waterproof drive" design that is where I'm headed, not so much the exact way I've drawn it out in this example. If the same goal can be accomplished another (better) way, then great!
     

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  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

  3. Luposian
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Sierra Vista, AZ

    Luposian Junior Member

    Ok, no reason for the magnet? It's the non-intrusive way of connecting the motor side to the outdrive side without any transom intrusion. Problem is, "Twist resistance". If the outside disk can be kept from turning (water resistance, weed tangle, hitting a rock, etc.), while the motor is turning, then the entire idea fails, except that the motor will never be harmed (jammed/over heated) in these events, because there is no direct connection... which is more or less a good aspect of a bad problem. :-D But how to "solidify" (increase twist resistance) the connection between the disks, using the same premise?

    As for the belt in water problem, I assume you're referring to pulley slippage, when the belt is wet, correct? How would you go about resolving this particular dilemma (I would probably go with a toothed belt, myself)?

    The hydraulic propulsion angle seems to be problematic in its own right, after browsing the link you've provided.
     
  4. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    I will agree with Fallguy, the transom penetration is not a big deal, can be above the waterline anyway, and the magnets are just added complexity.
    Unless enclosed in a watertight nacelle, the bottom belt/pulley will interrupt the flow of water to the Propeller, and waste energy by slinging water everywhere.
    Google “electric trolling motor” for some great ideas re your concept.
     
  5. Luposian
    Joined: Jun 2012
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    Location: Sierra Vista, AZ

    Luposian Junior Member

    While I don't agree with "Google electric trolling motor for some great ideas", as I've been doing that all along, I do agree with your assessment concerning the belt/pulley, as I had taken that into consideraton. Like I said, it's the "non-invasive" transom concept I'm after, not necessarily the exact design I drew. I do, however, think it is a unique approach to the idea, even if somewhat poorly implemented. :-D
     
  6. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 885
    Likes: 170, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Is this a solution looking for a non-problem to fix?
     
  7. Luposian
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 5
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    Location: Sierra Vista, AZ

    Luposian Junior Member

    How does a transom get rotted? By water intrusion into various holes and openings in the transom... eliminate the holes and you eliminate the problem! Assuming your boat didn't originally come with a non-wood core transom, if you need to replace it, if you use wood again, it's only a matter of time (most likely) before the same problem will rear it's head again. My goal was to eliminate the problem, period, even with wood.
     
  8. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 885
    Likes: 170, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    What percentage of I/O boats suffer from leaking outdrives?

    IMO outdrives can be sufficiently sealed using current best practices.

    How will your drive be attached to the hull?
    Any mounting bolts will represent the same potential for leaks as a traditional outdrive.

    I see a greatly complex system with less power transfer with the same leak potential.

    A solution looking for a problem which it fails to prevent.
     
  9. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    I enjoy creative ideas, but try for a new one.

    The one thing that bothers me about i/o is the idea the bellows will sink the ship.

    As far as transom rot; hell, a fishfinder screw can kick that off. That is why overbore and sealing is the professional method.
     

  10. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 692
    Likes: 79, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    I/O systems are not designed to be constantly submerged, and most of them live on trailer boats.
    The beauty of the I/O system is it’s ability to be raised and lowered, steered and trimmed out while underway, while not being a permanent projection below the boats bottom, where the trailer goes.
    Some owners choose to keep them in the water, and with surprisingly few failures.
    My dock neighbor has done that for over thirty years without a problem, with annual service, of course.
    Maybe the OPs idea of a twisty belt to allow steering the propulsion could be better facilitated with a longer belt, drive pulley high above the waterline, and a belt on the inside to connect to the motor below the floor.
    This might make gear reduction easy too, on the first set of pulleys. The final submerged pulley would necessarily be quite small diameter which will place massive strain on the belt and bearings, and the torque involved would require numerous holes in the transom to anchor it all down.
    I’ve seen some pretty cool flip up stern thrusters, maybe this is a better direction?
    Mount one on a turntable under the swim step? Swim steps are normally bolted on too, I guess!
    This reinventing of the wheel business is pretty tough.
     
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