New ~350cm sailing dinghy lines fitting my special needs.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by heavyweather, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. heavyweather
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Austria

    heavyweather Junior Member

    Dear all,

    I need a new hull plan that I can easily transport in my car (4 sections).
    I copied the PT-11 dinghy this summer and it basically does what I want but I need to simplify the design so that it can be built faster by anybody.
    IMG_20170913_134150.jpg
    Here's more of that...
    there is a built thread on woodenboat.forum also.

    What I have in mind is to reduce the beam from 125cm to a maximum of 120cm or even better a little less.
    There are two boats that almost fit my bill..
    The Mayfly 12 or the Summer Breeze. Both are 3 panel (2sheet) designs.
    Some things bother me about both designs though.
    Constant flare would be great. I don't need that much freeboard, the gunwales should be perpendicular to the sides so that I can cut them from plywood, route a groove and glue them on.
    Both got very much rocker. Do I need that much rocker?

    So basically I am looking for advice where to start, what works and how to get there.
    Performance is secondary to portability. I only sail in totally sheltered fresh water (Alte Donau/ Vienna), no waves, not very much wind most of the time.

    I started with the two bottom of the PT-11, the 3 lower panels and extruded the curve up in different angles. 21 degree on all but the purple hull. There the angle is 13° (the bottom aft is almost flat), which results in only 105cm of beam.
    Could I gain any meaningful results from building 1:5 models of my hulls and floating them?
    Test007.jpg

    Of course I read everything I can find on dinghy design online but my design needs to be a lot narrower or it won't fit my trunk.
    There is one commercial 4 split sailing dinghy called Reverso. I intent to copy their strap connection design on my boat.

    thank you,
     
  2. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 2,159
    Likes: 141, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1244
    Location: UK, USA and Canada

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Have you seen this design?

    Sailing Catamarans - Duo 10ft Sail/Row Dinghy (nesting option) http://www.sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/designs-2/46-beach-cats-and-dinghies/420-duo-10ft-sailrow-dinghy

    scroll down and you will see it fits in the back of our car.

    And this sailing trimaran version also fits in a car

    Sailing Catamarans - Tryst 10 trimaran http://www.sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/designs-2/27-trimarans-under-25/428-tryst-trimaran

    We drove all over the USA and then down to Mexico (over 8000 miles in total) a couple of years ago with it in the back, plus everything we needed for 4 months on the road.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
    heavyweather likes this.
  3. heavyweather
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 30
    Likes: 1, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Austria

    heavyweather Junior Member

    I like the Duo. How wide is the bottom? Only 1m beam?
     

  4. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 1,381
    Likes: 45, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 304
    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I like the oar spars in the pic at the very bottom of the page. I'm nuts for anything that serves a dual propose, especially on a small boat.

    But for flat, non-curved oars like those I'd use the flat end to fit into pockets on the sail.

    I guess one could engineer a sailing rig around using a pair of sculling oars for mast and boom, thus the mast wouldn't be in the way of a sliding seat rowing rig.
     
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