Need info and rigging plan for my Tancook Whaler Twin Masted Schooner

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by RAINYDAY, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. RAINYDAY
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    RAINYDAY Junior Member

    I HAVE A 1972 DUBBELENDED TANCOOK WHALER TWIN MASTED SCHOONER AND NEED A RIGING PLAN AND ANY INFO ON THE BOAT ITS SELF
     
  2. DCockey
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Is it fiberglass, 25' 6" length on deck, beam of 6' 4" and draft a little under 3'? If so it was probably built by Peter Van Dine in Annapolis, Maryland, and there is a 10 page article about it in "The Fourth Book of Good Boats" by Roger Taylor. The article includes a lines drawing and a sailplane, as well as an perspective drawing describing the features of the boat which also shows the rigging. The book has been out of print for a number of years but Abe Books and Alibris list copies available starting at $20.

    Small Craft Advisor (magazine) section on "what is it" had an inquiry about one a year ago and several folks responded. A number of folks consider them to be a very desirable boat.

    Van Dine also built a 35' Tancook Whaler but I don't know of a source of information about that one.

    You might also try the WoodenBoat forum. Folks there answer questions about traditional boats which are not wood. Include some dimensions and anything else which describes the boat.

    Finally, you will generally get a better response on most forums if you type the message using lower case with capitals as appropriate.
     
  3. Scunthorp
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    Location: Halifax

    Scunthorp Hull Tech

    Tancook Schooners

    I think you will find they are built near Halifax NS Canada. There are people still working on them here but they are harder to find. Tancook Island was first settled by the Germans who I think built these schooners I can dig around if you like it depends on what you are looking for I found a ton of stuff by goggling “ Tancook Schooners” and you should check out Wayne O’Leary’s Book. I hope this helps John…

    "The Tancook Schooners recounts the history of a remarkable, yet neglected, Atlantic Canadian watercraft. The "little Bluenoses," as they were called, formed the backbone of Nova Scotia's inshore fisheries and short-run coastal trade in the early twentieth century. The book also records the story of a unique, although in many ways typical, Maritime coastal community on the brink of the modern industrial age.

    Wayne O'Leary provides detailed descriptions of how the schooners were conceived and perfected, and paints a vivid picture of life on Tancook from the late eighteenth century into the twentieth century. He shows how national and international developments affected the lives of the Tancook Islanders and the character and uses of the vessel for which they became famous. He also includes many stories about individual builders and a wealth of photographs and drawings"
     
  4. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Tancook schooners were originally built on and around Tancook Island, but in the 20th century a number of boats more or less based on the originals were built elsewhere and called Tancooks schooners or Tancook whalers.
     
  5. RAINYDAY
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    RAINYDAY Junior Member

    No shes concrete feral 12 tons water line length 39.5' deck is about 48' to 50' and 11' wide she draws 3'-3.5' main mast 30' sica spruce fore mast 28' i have the main, fore, forestaysail, jib
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I don't remember Simpson offering a 48' - 50' Tancook schooner, though I could be wrong. There were a few ferro builders of that era, but the vast majority where home built. Post some photos of the boat. What is the manufacture name on the yacht's title?

    In any case, it's possible some plans survived, but don't hold your breath. This said, rigging up your schooner isn't especially difficult for an experienced rigger. If you have rigging experience, you could possibly sort it out yourself. If this is a new thing for you, then you'll have to hire a pro to sift through what you have, determine what you need and then implement an installation that suits what you want and have.

    In your area there are quite a few skilled riggers. I suspect if your boat is looking the worse for wear, then they don't want to touch it for fear of breaking something and having liability issues. On the other hand, I suspect there are a few old timers left that can help you out and get the old gal back in service.

    How about some back ground on you and the boat. How much sailing experience do you have, how long have you had the boat, what condition is it in generally, etc. This would lets us know the "big picture", which is what a prospective rigger is going to see, when he firsts looks over the prospective job.
     
  7. RAINYDAY
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    RAINYDAY Junior Member

    I come from a stevedoreing family but have no real sailing experience myself just commonsense. The boat was made by Swan and has had two retro one for ext work and once for the cabin, so far i have adapted an aluminum 30' mast for the main but my rigging and pulleys arn't right.I am getting ready to make two wood masts, booms and spars. I guess i'm doing good considering that when i got her she was laying port down in 6' of water,the wife and i have striped every bit of rotted teak from her belly and redone her and soon i will dry dock her and wrap her in carbon fiber and Kevlar 4 layers each 2 out side and two inside i will be posting picks soon there is a lot of them.As to my self and my exp there's nothing that i cant do i can trace my ancestry to Bartolemo Dias who was the first European to sail around the tip of Africa, and led a fleet of man-of-war ships,royalty and more. But he was more known Bartolemo Roberts or "black Bart" so sailing and piracy is in my blood.Thank u for your help Capt. Robert's
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2010
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's absolutely no advantage to
    This is just a waste of money and effort and frankly a lot of both. Neither fiber have anything they can offer a ferro hull. Okay, technically, they'll offer quite a bit, but why, especially when conventional repairs/materials will handle the tasks at a fraction of the cost and labor.

    What and/or who has suggested such a hull treatment? If it was a person suggesting this, then I'd strongly recommend you stop listening to them. Has the hull been comprehensibly surveyed? This is the first step to finding out what you really need.
     
  9. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    What Par said.It would be a complete waste of expensive materials and lots of labor. This is not meant as a slur against ferro, it would be just as much of a waste on a wood or fiberglass or steel hull. Just do proper ferro repairs and as long as the boat was built well in the first place you will be fine.
    Steve.
     
  10. RAINYDAY
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    RAINYDAY Junior Member

    she has moister seepage and a small crack on the bow seam and she was originally wrapped in 3 layers of glass and there are areas that need attention so to make it a little stronger and last a little longer is fine with me and seeing how i got the material total of 21 roles 4'x100' for free why not right.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sell the free materials and use the proceeds to buy what you need. If the ferro hull was sheathed from the builder, then there was a problem with the ferro and the sheathing was an attempt to hide it.

    Again, has the boat had a comprehensive survey recently?
     
  12. RAINYDAY
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    RAINYDAY Junior Member

    the closest boat to me is the "Forbes and Carmon" same rig the house is not separated and not as long but its only close not the same any ideas.
     

  13. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Early American small boat schooner rig--
    Single shrouds fore and main. See Chapelle's book "American Small Sailing Craft" pg 67 for all rig details.
    2:1 throat and peak halyards, 3:1 mainsheet, foresail overlaps the main and has a 3:1 sheet. As simple as it gets.
     
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