Need help with some interior design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by sandog, Jul 3, 2022.

  1. sandog
    Joined: Jan 2021
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    Location: 92625

    sandog Junior Member

    Good afternoon.

    My current boat just sunk at the dock due to unforeseen issues, and I needed to gut the downstairs. There is two full bedrooms.

    I was wondering if there is anyone, or services, I can talk to, about contracting them, to help design out the two bedrooms again, as far as walls, ceiling, cabinet layouts, etc.

    Thank you
     
  2. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    You must have had it insured?
    Carefully weigh the costs of rebuilding vs buying another boat.
    Much more than interior finishes are involved here, especially if the water is salt.
    All electrical and much mechanical components will need to be replaced too, and you’ll be surprised at how quickly the sum of the parts (plus labor) can exceed the whole.
     
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  3. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    +1 re KapnD's comments above.
    Unless you have a particularly strong sentimental / emotional attachment to this vessel, if you have her covered by insurance then you would probably be better off using the insurance monies to (put towards the) purchase cost of a suitable replacement vessel.
    If you are not insured, still think carefully about the cost of refurbishing your vessel - it might still prove to be more expensive (and a lot of stress and hassle) compared to the cost of buying a replacement that is 'ready to go'.

    Can you tell us a bit more about what type / make / size of vessel she is please?
    Is she the 63' steel motor vessel that is the subject of your previous thread, re the link below?
    Swim Platform Design ideas/help for steel hull truller https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/swim-platform-design-ideas-help-for-steel-hull-truller.65058/
     
  4. sandog
    Joined: Jan 2021
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    Location: 92625

    sandog Junior Member

    Yes, it is from the previous post.

    For the overhaul, I do understand, we had already gutted many of the electrical systems, as the previous owners did some really wonky stuff.

    I decided it would be easier to work from scratch on plumbing and electrical than try to integrate using the existing systems. Water also did not completely flood the vessel. The water was brackish, with low salt content.

    Flew my mechanic back up and he got all the engines, 2 propulsion, 2 generators, all working and running perfectly. Including producing electricity.

    So I do understand that the major components will need replacing, but again, most were gutted. The Victron components were not in the boat yet, nor were the 10 tons of Air conditioning components. The 50kwh of LiFePO4 batteries had not yet been installed, and neither had the 8 LiFePO4 headway batteries for the thrusters. If they had been, I would walk for sure. The shower was two days from having the marble installed. Pumps for toilet systems and water maker were not submerged.

    Windlass did not go underwater either.

    We have gutted the boat down to the steel hull in the lower cabins.

    Insurance will pay for about 60% of what I have into it, not including all the gear that was in storage. The boat was going to be re-evaluated at the end of June to cover me with the additional items done since the original survey.

    Vessell is a 65', without a swim platform, manufactured by De Groot. The issue was a steel plate that was scheduled to be replaced in July, as it was 6.5mm, rather than 10mm, and there appears to be a heavy amount of galvanic corrosion from stray current in the water, as my zincs look about 20% worn on the stern end, closest to shore power, and 5% on the bow end. The bottom paint is also blistering. The boat has/had a galvanic isolation system on board.

    So again, I did get very lucky as the major systems were sitting in storage and about to be put into the vessel, but nearly all electrical and all plumbing were being replaced. Plumbing systems had all pex put in, with 2 24 port manifolds. The only thing plumbing-wise that will need to be replaced is the kohler 4 valve digital shower controller.
     
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  5. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    This news is much more encouraging!

    Although this part is rather worrying -
    Assuming that this plate is in the hull shell, then this steel plate would have had to be MUCH less than 6.5 mm thick for it to simply fail catastrophically while at rest alongside the dock (at least I presume that the vessel was not underway at the time?).
    Do you have the boat ashore now? If so, I think it would be useful to now do a detailed ultrasound thickness test of the whole bottom (or has this been done already?).
    Re how your bottom paint is blistering, could this be due to stray currents flowing in the hull itself?
    Before the vessel sank, did you have the electrical system insulated from the hull, or was it grounded to the hull?
    You mention a galvanic isolator on board - was it working properly prior to the vessel sinking?
     
  6. sandog
    Joined: Jan 2021
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    Location: 92625

    sandog Junior Member

    I did a detailed ultrasonic of the hull. That area of the plate is designed as a consumable as it is designed to be the lowest point in the bilges and where the bilge pump sits. Another detail of ultrasonic will be completed due to this. The boat is ashore. I believe it is due to a high level of galvanic corrosion, with some water that was in the bilge from the mechanic.

    The galvanic isolator was working, and we did not have any strat currents being shown during testing, but again, the electrical system was being gutted due to the previous owner, a shipyard owner, during some incredibly wonky stuff with everything they touched. Hence the reason much of it was being gutted. Easier to have a clean slate, and do it right, than trying to figure out what they were thinking/doing and half-*** it to make it work.

    Basically, the more we pulled apart the first month, the more we realized just start fresh.

    It did suck to lose a new electrical panel that was being built with all of the circuit breakers and controls. Not even on the wall yet, but was submerged, so all toast now.

    The 4 flir ax8's and the flir m200, along with a new washer and dryer, and a canon 5dmkIV along with about 7 L series lenses, including a 300mm F2.8 and some suits and tuxes I had on board, are probably the worse casualties.

    Engines, as well as transmissions, are great, working good. Microcommanders I need to open and see if water got in there. Again, not going to cry over that as it was a toss if I was going to replace them or not. Yacht Commander had also not yet been delivered, nor had the Chetco NMEA systems.
     
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  7. sandog
    Joined: Jan 2021
    Posts: 12
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    Location: 92625

    sandog Junior Member

    The amount of insulation on the boat was incredible. But the engine room, they had 3 layers of acoustic ceiling tile, then 1.5" thick foam. Then 1/2" plywood. All of that insulation will also need to be replaced. Looking to do spectrum spray-on deadener, then go with about 3" of corning 705 insulation. In the living room, on top of the engine room, looking to lay down 1/16" lead sheeting under the wood flooring.
     
  8. sandog
    Joined: Jan 2021
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 2, Points: 3
    Location: 92625

    sandog Junior Member

    Was doing a follow up on this.

    My original question was I was wondering if there is anyone, or services, I can talk to, about contracting them, to help design out the two bedrooms again, as far as walls, ceiling, cabinet layouts, etc.
     

  9. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Barbados

    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Do you have any existing plans of the boat?
    If not, then anybody drawing new plans for you would have to come and take some measurements off the empty hull shell.
    I don't think you necessarily need a naval architect to do this - it might be worthwhile contacting a local architectural technician to see if they might be keen on having a go at this?
    So long as they are aware that a boat has some curves - for example I am guessing that your deck has some camber, and the hull sides probably have a bit of flare, and of course the shape of the hull in plan view will change as you go forward.
    Just make sure that they don't specify house materials like chipboard!
     
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