Need help locating these plans (Cecil (Cece) Norris design 76 ft Barquentine)

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by gillikin31, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. gillikin31
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NC

    gillikin31 Junior Member

    Ok so this is a Cecil (Cece) Norris design 76ft Barquentine and i am pretty sure it was never built. However i been searching for awhile to find more about the design or if he even finished designing it. But it seems as if he disappeared after samson marine. Does anyone have any info or know where to find more info ?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    Unlikely......His middle initial is F if that's any help. Hartley & Brooks http://www.hartley-boats.com/
    Are the current dealers for Samson designs, including some by Mr. Norris.

    That will not be a very good boat, 125 ton displacement on a 68' waterline with 2800 sq ft of sail in a bunch of tiny rags with huge windage. And the main deck is way too low with bulwarks that are far too high with nowhere near enough drainage.......
     
  3. gillikin31
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NC

    gillikin31 Junior Member

    Thank Tad,
    I got the impression form these 2 pages that it was a very rough draft and i agree with you that it needs major improvment. I've just been wondering if he ever finished it or if he even designed anything after samson marine.
     
  4. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    John Simpson in Vancouver might know something, they were contemporary's working for Samson.....
     
  5. gillikin31
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NC

    gillikin31 Junior Member

    John passed away about 3 or so years ago
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 474, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Tad isn't this the company that pretty much insured the sad reputation of ferro in the USA?
     
  7. gillikin31
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NC

    gillikin31 Junior Member

    I was hoping we would not all head down the ferro road again.......... And i'm dont be so sure it was just samson marine
     
  8. tazmann
    Joined: Aug 2005
    Posts: 329
    Likes: 17, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 215
    Location: California

    tazmann Senior Member

  9. gillikin31
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NC

    gillikin31 Junior Member

    No we were speaking of John Samson
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 474, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    No we're not heading down the ferro road again, though Samson's role is well established in modern yacht building history and deserved. Of course, there were others trying to jump on the band wagon too. Are you seriously thinking about building that boat? Really? Considering the outlay for a project like that, wouldn't you like some modern engineering, so fuel and build costs aren't so extreme, not to mention safety and performance.
     
  11. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
    Posts: 2,303
    Likes: 185, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2281
    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    I would doubt anyone is seriously considering building a monster FC boat in this day and age....steel will be far cheaper and quicker (not to mention stronger, lighter, faster, insurable, and an all round better investment) today.

    NA John Simpson did work for Samson Marine back in the day......

    John Samson was a sailor who discovered the technology of building modern (at the time, late 1960's) steel reinforced concrete boats while in New Zealand. He brought the idea back to Western Canada, and partnered with Geoff Wellens (professional writer) to promote cheap home built boats. They hired NA Cece Norris and others to create designs for the goldrush (in hindsight) market. About the same time there was also a flood of escapists building plywood trimarans. Bruce Roberts got cranked up about the same time, except he was promoting "building Parks" which was a good idea where a bunch of amateurs banded together to help each other.
     
  12. gillikin31
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 10
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NC

    gillikin31 Junior Member

    No i am not planning on building that boat but i like the look of her however i have been around boats and done enough sailing to know she is pourly designed... I am planning on building a schooner in the 70 ft range most likly of steel even though i would prefer copper nickel but the cost of it is outragious. The biggest problem i have is i am not crazy about metal boats and a large FC is out the question because there is no really skilled labor left in the USA. But i am still 2 years from starting so i have time to figure it out.
     

  13. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
    Posts: 1,002
    Likes: 86, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 933
    Location: Hobart

    pdwiley Senior Member

    Take a look at Tom Colvin's designs. He has a 66' steel schooner design that IMO could be stretched to be a 70' hull without dramas. It's less than a 10% stretch after all.

    I'm building a 38' junk schooner design of his at the moment. As I'm now doing the internal fitout and have finished the steel work, I can say that the hull went together nicely and I'm happy with the advice & assistance I got. I may build a bigger one in the future if I get really bored (but not 66' though).

    PDW
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.