Need Help identifying an old wooden boat

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Sindel, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. Sindel
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Ohio

    Sindel Junior Member

    I ran across this old boat sitting in an old guy's garage...
    He said it was a 1932 or 33 Garwin?
    I'm thinking it's a Garwood...
    The boat measures 16' 2" long.
    It's powered by an old Greymarine Flathead 6 with dual carbs...
    Most of the hardware appears to be here with the boat,
    but it all needs to be re-chromed.

    See the Pictures...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

  3. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    Buy it......................................................Get rid of the new steering wheel
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    That's their (Garwood) small utility. The carpeted interior gives rise to a host of problems, not the least of which is it's ability to trap moisture against the wood, rotting it out.

    In excellent condition they can fetch a good price, but in the current market, difficult to say how much. In it's present condition, not it's not worth much. It needs to be fully disassembled, repaired, refurbished and most importantly of all, era correct pieces returned to her, if interested in retaining her value. Some of these pieces (like the original helm wheel) will be difficult to find, will probably also need restoration and costly as sin. As she is, she has more value parting out the pieces.

    I would recommend not buying it, unless you're interested in a long, painful and quite expensive project.

    If looking for a wooden boat to run around in, then find a better example or build from new, both of which will be cheaper and less painful.
     
  5. Sindel
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Ohio

    Sindel Junior Member

    Ike, thanks for the heads-up on that web address... I was thinking a utility or maybe an ensign... That sites picture will be helpful while trying to restore her...

    rasorinc, buying it, and do you want that hot rod wheel?

    PAR, I've read and used info from many of your post and very much respect your opinion. I understand that this boat will require a lot of new wood. I took a quick pick up under the bow and saw new 1by oak boards screwed between the original frame members, so I'm sure the stuff hidden under that carpet is scary...

    My first boat was a project in itself...
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    When I was done...
    My 1951 18' Chris Craft Riviera
    [​IMG]

    I can fix her wood...
    Finding part? I've never really come across any garwood parts anywhere...
    I saw Miss America IX at a show once (and WOW Garwood was crazy) , and I seen a few replicas, but I've never seen a whole lot of garwood's anywhere...
    Can parts be duplicated?
    Is there any way of determining what belongs on the boat?
    Colors? Is the engine right?
    How might one research this information?
    Is anyone still alive?

    I've also though about building a barrelback from some plans I've come across... I also have a relative with an original 1942 Vhris Craft 19' custom barrellback. I was thinking I could use his as a reference, but having come across this gar has really changed my thinking on possiblities...

    Please give me your thoughts.

    .
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Since you done a Riviera, you know the troubles you'll be looking at. The Chris had the luxury of a fairly large following, reasonable parts availability and records to account for all that was possibly on the boat originally.

    Garwood's, though do have a loyal following isn't nearly as big as the Chris and the era this one was built wasn't known for good record keeping, documentation, etc., making research more difficult. The "war years" boats are particularly difficult to do for this reason. Companies geared up for war time production, leaving much on the back burner to be lost or forgotten. When they got back to production of pleasure craft, things were different.

    The runabouts of that era would have been barrel backed and typically had the M47S Chrysler Crown engine. The utility was shaped as yours is.

    There are several sites that specialize in these babies, but be careful, some will try to sell you a Chris Craft part, saying it's a Garwood.

    They just didn't make all that many, so good examples are hard to come by for reference. The utility instrument panel was spartan, yours look to have some additions, but it's the right shape. The helm wheel was a pretty cool looking wire spoke thing, sort of like the 50's Jaguar or Triumph (automotive).

    Repowering boats is a very common thing to do. Rather then rebuild, a full up swap out is preformed and likely the case with your boat. A well detailed Gray would look, perform and resell nicely in that old gal.

    As far as research, it's all leg work. The shows, swap meets, on line clubs, etc. will get you started.
     
  7. Sindel
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Ohio

    Sindel Junior Member

    Thanks PAR, I thought that engine might be out of its era...

    Does anyone know where one might look for photos of Garwood boats for reference? websites? recommended reading? Do you have any photos to share?

    I'll be going back to possibly buy that boat Tuesday...
    What kind of price do you think I should offer?
    He wants 3K, I thinking half...
    Anyone?
     
  8. ned L
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: N.E. Connecticut

    ned L Junior Member

    A book has been published on the history of Garwood & his boats (called "Garwood" I think), I can check my copy to see if there are any photos of this model.
     
  9. ned L
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: N.E. Connecticut

    ned L Junior Member

    Sindel, I'm thinking you didn't catch PAR's 'war years' comment. By the stem head shape alone this is not a 1930's boat. It is a later 1940's.

    [​IMG]
     

  10. santiagomunoz72
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    Location: Colombia

    santiagomunoz72 santia72gomunoz

    Old boat identification

    Good evening, I really need your help in the identification of an ancient boat i recently purchased.
    I think it can be 20s or 30s. measure 25 feet long, has 3 rows of seats but what most attracts me is the engine it have.
    It is a v8 engine Hispano Suiza Model A with a transmission Capitol Marine fromSt Paul, Minnesota.
    The engine is an aircraft engine because it have 2 spark plugs per cylinder.
    The engine is an original equipment.
    I think it can be a garwood Boat.
     

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