Mysticshore 12 gets started.

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by LP, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    LP Flying Boatman

    Going Topless

    Here she is in the water. More to come.


    One more pic. It's a lousy photo, but cool looking. Kind of impressionistic.
     

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  2. Manie B
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    Manie B Senior Member

  3. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Good stuff. If I'm not building something myself, the next best thing is following along with someone who is. And you're providing plenty of pic's and explanation. I don't sit here scratching my...um...head...and wondering, 'wotdidedothere?!? And why?'
     
  4. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Thanks for the updates and supplementary instructions, LP! Looks great.
     
  5. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Float test

    Float test went well. It was nice to feel like I was floating "on" the water rather "in" the water like a feel with the 7.5' single-sheeter. Tracking was relatively good though a bit of a skeg will be required. I guess a pure hull won't be a true tracker without some sort of an appendage.

    Balance was close, but I had to shift the seat position forward 2" to put her on her lines. I'm beginning to think my sitting CG is further aft than I'm calculating it. I had to shift my sitting position forward 2" in the single-sheeter also. Maybe, I recline more than anticipated. I'm going to start calculating my CG at 10" forward of the seatback rather than 12".

    Stability felt good, too. After paddling around in the single-sheeter, this one certainly feels very firm. I was comfortable enough with the stability that I took my
    three year old out for a short paddle to check balance and stability in that mode. It's very nice to have a plan come together so nicely. Except for balance, all expectations are being realized. The balance is very easily accounted for and corrected at this stage in the build.

    I'm thinking I'll do one more float test before getting into full swing on he decks and finish. I want to work the skeg details out while I'm still playing in the goo. I'm very eager to try some sprints with the longer hull to see how she'll perform while paddling aggressively.
     
  6. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Deck preliminaries

    This is it for two weeks.

    I'm trying really hard to screw up the forward deck. First I tried to fit it without taping the outer seam. No catastrophic failure like I predicted, but it was starting to break the glue joint. So back to the glue table for the 4 ox. s-glass. Then I started to fit it . . . upside down. :mad: Finally screwed my head on and started making some progress.

    The first pic shows my first attempted fitting with my deck alignment set-up to ensure the forward deck seam layed on centerline. The second pic shows the decks fitted in place with my system for clamping the deck edges. Eventually, I'll place the edge blocks around the entire edge of the deck.

    I'm working towards a more finished product than my first to prototypes. Floating was their primary where this build is the complete package. The edge blocks should give me a nice distributed clamping force for when the deck is glued on. I used pan head screws on the prototype and ended up with dimples at the screws holes that needed filling and fairing. They don't look that bad, but I "know" they are there. Another tendency in the forward deck is for the forward few inches to go flat. The small width at the point is difficult to get to curve. There may be a finesse way to fix it, but don't know it, so I'm taking the brute force path. I've added a 6" long stiffener under the forward deck from the breasthook to the the forward most bulkhead. The is stiffener is higher than the shear so the deck has to conform to. Works good--last long time.:cool:

    I did go in and reshape the forward bulkheads to the new contour. I believe the new profile works. Once the forward deck was tightened into place, The rest when pretty smoothly. Since I had to glass the outer deck seam, The laminate buildup is much too thick. It creates a flat spot across the deck at the joint. One my reasons for going ahead and fitting the deck was to try to force some curvature into the joint while the epoxy was still green. The joint will sit this way for two weeks while I'm unable to work with it. I'll be curious to see if it takes a set. I'm considering removing a layer of glass from the bottom side of the joint with an angle grinder before continuing. The afterdeck went on without any special effort. I think that I could reduce it's height a bit also.

    My plan right now is to have access panels in the cockpit fore and aft bulkheads. I may eventually start accessorizing my decks, but clear and clean is good for me. With the deck fitted in place, I'll be able to plunge a router in and cut the accesses quickly and cleanly.
     

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  7. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    A little progress. I've made and glued the access hatch doublers. I can't say for sure in I like the extra effort. In the prototypes, I simply used a frame and an oversized hatch that would lay against the frame with a seal. Easier and quicker to build as there aren't any fiddly little pieces to deal with. It's less efficient material wise as you are essentially making double frames and throwing away the middle of one. With the current build, the center cutout is used for the hatch. Perhaps it's more asthetically pleasing. If we are counting ounces, this method is slightly heavier, too.

    I also added my skeg. Sorry, no pic, yet.

    A pic of the bow deck camber support. (Yes, that is a knot hole, but I'm calling it a lightening hole. :p)

    I've been fighting some amine blush problems. My current solution is to wet sand, wire brush it while it's wet, rinse and do an acetone wipe down before epoxying. Wet sanding works well as the the sand paper doesn't get clogged amine blush residue. I have not done the epoxy part, yet. I'm getting a little frustrated with it as I've never had this kind of a blush problem before. I'm a recent northerner and have switched to a faster epoxy to get decent cure time. It's cool and humid here so I may have to try to modify one or both of these elements if I get into a serious building project.

    Right now I've tried removing the blush with a soap and water scrub, water rinse, sand and acetone wipe. This has worked in the high spots where the surface is nicely abraded, but the low spots (dimples and low grain) where the sand paper doesn't reach easily, the epoxy acts like the area is still contaminated. This has been a problem where I'm building surface coats and I am using the epoxy to fair the surface and fill in the the grain of the ply. My structural connections get an agressive sanding with a heavy grit so there is no doubt about those connection. My current plan to remedy further blush problems is to pick a time when I can do hot coats and build the coats before the blush has a chance to form.
     

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  8. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Did a lot of sanding yesterday. That was the extent of my mental capacity. Prepped surfaces for epoxy and made brackets for the seat. Guess I had a little brain power yesterday afterall. Epoxied the rough bracket pieces in yesterday. The seat bracets took a 12 deg. angle to make the top surface level. I left the surface that mates to the hull sides straight, used thickened epoxy to fill the gap and only clamp the extreme ends so there would be no flattening of the hull sides as a result. Also, filleted the the skeg.
    MysticShore12 059.jpg
    Today, applied the final coat of epoxy on the underside of the deck pieces in preparation for deck installation. Coated the rib frames. Shaped the seat brackets and epoxy coated them. Filleted the frames and the bulkheads at the sheer rail as this was left undone for earlier. Used some left over thickening resin to fill some low spots on the bottom of the hull.

    I'm eager to show you my plan for seat adjustment. I think it is simple enough and allows for fine tuning the hull trim with seat/paddler placement. I have a couple of pieces to make tomorrow and it will be ready for the public. :cool:

    If all goes well, I'll start putting the decks on tomorrow. If the weather is nice though, I may have to go try out the skeg and seat brackets. :D

    The second picture is actually upsidedown, but the boat is upsidedown on the sawhorses so everthing is kosher.:eek:
    MysticShore12 061.jpg
     
  9. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Posting photos.

    Can anyone jump in and tell me how to post photos within my text? I suspect there is some HTML tom foolery involved. My poor synapses can only figure out the attachment part. THX.
     
  10. Boat Design Net Moderator
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    Boat Design Net Moderator Moderator

    attachments flowed with the text

    If you want to have attachment thumbnails (still linked to the full size images) appear inline with text, after uploading you can click the the paperclip attachment icon and you'll get a dropdown with the uploaded files.

    move-attachmenit-inline.jpg

    Click one and it will be inserted inline where the curser is.

    Alternately, to pull a non-thumbnail inline you can use IMG tags.

    Nice thread and nice work LP.
     
  11. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Very nice. Thanks for the recon, (Jeff ?).
     
  12. Boat Design Net Moderator
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    Boat Design Net Moderator Moderator

    Thanks again for sharing the build here.

    Best wishes,

    Jeff.
     
  13. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Forward deck is glued and curing.

    MysticShore12 063.jpg

    Another upsidedown is rightsideup photo. Since I'm using a shelf/sheer rail, I'm not filleting the hull/deck seam. I'm only filleting the after edges of the forward frame and bulkhead at the deck. Prior to mounting the deck, I put a champher on the upper, after edges of those parts. This allows the thickened epoxy to fill in around the parts a bit. I don't tape the joints either. I figure it's a low stress area and the techniques I'm using are adequate and don't add unnecessary weight. so far, this has worked well on my other kayaks. I will do the same for the after deck, but on the forward edges.

    The two inboard stringers in the photo will eventually be deck carlins, but right now they are just sprung into place to help hold the deck in position while the epoxy cures.
     
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  14. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Adjustable seat mount.

    The onboard seat mount.

    MysticShore12 066.jpg

    The seatback cross-member seated in the mount.

    MysticShore12 067.jpg

    View from above with the seat spacer for the solo paddler position. This spacer moves the seat 4" forward. The thin section shims the cross-member to account for increasing hull width and helps restrain the spacer.

    MysticShore12 068.jpg

    Spacer in position prior to reseating the cross-member.

    MysticShore12 069.jpg

    Seat in position with spacer in place.

    MysticShore12 070.jpg

    View from ahead of the seat. The shim portion is visible behind the cross-member.

    MysticShore12 071.jpg

    One more view from behind.

    MysticShore12 072.jpg

    I plan to use lanyards to attach the spacers to the seat cross-member to keep them close when not in use. It's not rocket science, but it should function respectably.
     

  15. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    All decked out.

    Progress continues intermittently. Preparation for the aft deck went slowly trying to tie up all the little chores that are easiest done with the deck off. The end result is nice and I think that I got nice butt joints on the side decks. I'm thinking that the butts joint looks nicer than the scarfs on the sides and bottom. The doublers (butt blocks of 4mm ply) will act as nice load paths for stresses applied to the coaming.

    The deck edge was dressed out with a 1/4" x 3/8" (+/-) bump rail of oak. Feathered to the deck edge and rounded over for a smooth transition, it finishes the deck nicely and provides a bit of protection at the dock.

    The final shape of the cockpit was determined and carlins around the opening are installed. Time was spent this weekend roughing in the cockpit coaming and their forward edge is glued and curing in preparation for their installation.

    MysticShore12 086.jpg MysticShore12 087.jpg

    Lastly, assembly holes around the deck and bump rail are filled and curing with thickened epoxy. Except for the filled holes, the deck received its final sanding in preparation for the glass sheathing. Depending on timing and the curing process, I may laminate the deck tonight, but most likely, I'll start it in the morning and do hot coats throughout the day to minimze blush formation.

    ===================================================

    Took the kayak out this weekend for additional water tests. The seat placement based on previous testing proved accurate and seat function worked nicely. I've decided the use a square throwable life preserver for the child seat. I plan to add some 1/2" half-round pieces athwartship to define the seat's location and to provide some stiffening to an otherwise large span of hull. I'm considering the same just ahead of the forward seat cross-member in the solo paddling position to also help retain the seat.

    The skeg worked well and the kayak tracks very nicely. Turning takes a bit of effort and indicates a bit of trimming of the skeg might be beneficial. I am debating the long low and strong A/R vs. the short(lengthwise) and exposed high A/R debate on changing the skeg.

    ===================================================

    I almost forgot. I did a weigh-in and the kayak is sitting at 33 lbs. prior to glassing the deck. That leaves the deck glass, coaming and finish. I think we'll make it in under 40 lbs. :) I'll keep my fingers crossed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011
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