My new baby! 6.8 Meter fiber over wood fishing boat !

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Vulkyn, Jun 13, 2010.

  1. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Grain direction is one of the most problematic issues in printing. just having the wrong grain direction means the paper will expand under the cylinder pressure and cause miss registration.
    I imagine the grain direction will have similar issues ....
     
  2. pedalingbiped
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    pedalingbiped Junior Member

    Usually scaling down is easier than scaling up.
     
  3. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    The lods ahould be sawn to planks, then dried. Preferably quarter sawn as Hoyt mentioned. And if possible not exposed to the sun.
     
  4. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Hmm they only dry it in the sun .....

    So ill tell them to quarter saw them
    then place them under the shade to dry ... 1 week or more ?
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    One month or more I think.

    It has to come below 12% moisture content.
     
  6. Questor
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    Questor Senior Member

    There are many variables that apply to drying wood properly.What works well in one locale won't work well in another due to differences of wind, temperature and humidity. Here in Alberta's dry climate steam is sometimes added to kilns to slow the rate of evaporation. The question you ask needs to be answered by local experts that are more experienced with local climatic conditions.
     
  7. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Problem is the way they dry it as i posted in the pics ... just in the sun. The way local yards work is by trial and error with no scientific measures at all.

    I will have to ask around to find some one with proper experience in the matter and see what he says.

    Is there any way i can measure moisture in the wood?
     
  8. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

    yes - back home in Finland - logs are being sprayed with water in summer time before sawing so they wouldn't dry too fast.
    I would think that open sun in Egypt is pretty darn harsh and drying happens very fast. That would also explain the big cracks on the pic of logs posted earlier.

    You can find probably a lot of info of drying wood in the web. But generally slow drying is much much better. And we are talking of months vs weeks.
     
  9. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

  10. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Man its a lot tougher getting anything done in Egypt lol ... too many variables that are not handled scientifically.

    So cut the log into timber then let dry in the shade. Average temp is between 30 - 45 degrees summer. So i dont think you need direct sun ! humidity i need to measure . time to buy some equipment.
     
  11. kerosene
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    kerosene Senior Member

    have you made it a mission to get banned Vazer? what is wrong with you? If over 11 years old I would say quite a bit.
     
  12. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member

    Thx mate ! Ill see what i can do ....

    Worst case scenario i can use a digital weight and compare a dry peace with a new one after identically cutting them ... better than nothing i recon
     
  13. Questor
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    Questor Senior Member

    My only experience in highly technical wood drying came from two days during which my boiler was used for a variety of experiments in a high tech furniture grade kiln operation. There is more than simply water to be removed. Water goes quickly while oils and other organic compounds move at different rates. Even in the high tech environment I was exposed to proper process was determined by trial and error because the theoretical math used by the Engineers did not work.While there I noticed that the foremen had small hand held meters that they used to measure moisture content. I don't remember what they were called but one foreman told me they were cheap to buy. They tested moisture content and quality of drying by taking a sample from the kiln, cutting it into narrow strips and then comparing the moisture contents at varying depths from the test sample.
     
  14. Vulkyn
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    Vulkyn Senior Member


  15. Questor
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    Questor Senior Member

    With temperatures that high you probably have to moisten the outside of the wood periodically to prevent the outside from drying too quickly.I've known a few custom furniture builders here that wipe down their expensive imported lumber with water soaked rags. Their objects are to keep some moisture on the surface and dilute and remove organic compounds that could seal the outside of the wood. They take 30 to 45 days to acclimatize imported dry, finished lumber to our dry region.
     
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