Muffler Drains

Discussion in 'Propulsion' started by 5teve, Mar 7, 2018.

  1. 5teve
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 17
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Perth, Australia

    5teve Junior Member

    Hi Guys

    Trying to find thoughts on muffler drains - I have twin Cummins 330 6bta's and i'm trying to reduce the amount of moisture the turbos would potentially see as I do not have the headroom (or funds currently) to have a fancy exhaust with a rise out of the turbo - i'm just on stock elbows but as far as I am aware - they drain ok and water is below turbo level.

    Anyhow.. i'm pondering adding a drain to each muffler (water lift, aqualift etc) so that when I shut the engines down I can empty the mufflers almost completely and therefore minimize any moisture in the exhaust - As I am Perth Australia based it generally doesnt freeze so drains are not common on lift mufflers.

    What are your thoughts?

    Steve
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 12,834
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't think it will make much difference on the moisture content of the air. The hot air mixed with water is what contains the vapor. Unless you manage to flush the moisture out and replace with dry air, it won't be a significant improvement.
     
  3. 5teve
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 17
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Perth, Australia

    5teve Junior Member

    Well by removing the water I am thinking that for extended layover, the exhaust will be able to breath the warm dry air we have here, whereas if the muffler is half full then the output pipe from the muffler is blocked to the outside world. I'm really not sure in reality if this is the case?

    Having the drain also has the advantage of being able to drain mufflers if I have starting issues - which may be justification in itself!

    Steve
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 12,834
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    What material are the mufflers? You may be able to simply tap a threaded hole and put a screw with a rubber washer. That is the standard factory drain on most muflers.
     
  5. 5teve
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 17
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Perth, Australia

    5teve Junior Member

    They are fibreglass so I would be looking at using a tank connector / Bulkhead connector to get the valve onto. I can get access to the inside via the inlet tubes (I think)

    Steve
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 12,834
    Likes: 255, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You can simply epoxy a valve to it. They come with a self-tapping screw as a drain from the factory.
     

  7. 5teve
    Joined: Nov 2017
    Posts: 17
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Perth, Australia

    5teve Junior Member

    Hi Gonzo

    There are no drains at all in the Mufflers. They are locally made and therefore don't have drains (stupidly) i'm thinking a stainless bulkhead fitting and tap may work best.. like a tank fitting.

    steve
     
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