Moving Forward in my restoration!

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by merrile, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. merrile
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Oregon

    merrile Junior Member

    Boat

    Well, I got the boat gutted/Sanded and I am not getting ready to replace the transom and put in the new wood. Please tell me if I am missing a step of the process here.

    Question 1

    I will buy and cut 2 pieces ¾-inch ply as the transom. I will epoxy glue piece (A) to piece (B). Do I need place a piece of fiberglass between them along with the glue or is the glue enough?


    Question 2

    Once together, Should I encapsulate the entire transom in Fiberglass mat and glue it to the hull?

    Question 3

    What thread count fiberglass and seem tape should I be looking for. Why is it so expensive? And can the same thread count be used for the sole when I put that wood in!

    Thanks,
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 474, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes, glue the plywood pieces together with thickened epoxy.

    No, you don't need fabric between the two, but to prevent air from being trapped, prop up one end slightly as you temporary fasten the sheets together. This will let air escape as it's dogged down. Remove screws when cured. I apply the thickened goo with a notched trowel.

    You should encapsulate all the wood, with at least three coats of epoxy. This includes any notches, cutouts, screw holes, etc. No raw wood should be installed in the boat.

    Use 6 or 12 ounce biax (the 6" tape form) for the transom seams. You'll use this along the edges of the cockpit sole too, but not in the middle of the sole. This material will be regular cloth to save a little money.

    How much tabbing? This depends on the boat and how it's equipped. As a general rule, you want as much if not more material thickness in the tabbing as was previously there. Using biax and epoxy you can get away with thinner lay-ups, but this is a risk as novice laminates are prone to have flaws, dry areas, resin rich areas, etc., so error on the too much material side is safe.

    Check out other transom repair threads on this site, with the search tool.
     
  3. merrile
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 8
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    Location: Oregon

    merrile Junior Member

    Sounds good, One last thing how much expoxy should I buy and how much fiberglas sshould I get.

    my boat is 4ft wide by 14ft in lenght. Its late and I am too dumb to figure the square foot to yard conversion right now!

    This is the stuff I am looking at buying they are local so I can go in a pick them it up if needed


    http://www.tapplastics.com/shop/category.php?bid=6&
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 474, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Log onto www.westsystem.com and www.systemthree.com, then download their respective user's guides. These will explain how to work with the goo, fillers, coverage, etc.

    Judging from the nature of your questions, you should strongly consider a good bit of research into the products, techniques, methods and tools used in these types of repairs. You can chew up a lot of costly materials, fairly quickly with bad batches, or laminates, just from lack of experience.
     

  5. merrile
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Oregon

    merrile Junior Member

    thank par I will so that!
     
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