Migrating to the marina. Is this feasible?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Kyle Rogers, May 18, 2021.

  1. comfisherman
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Alaska

    comfisherman Senior Member

    Problem with this sketch is the heaviest part of the whole deal is in the bow. So more than likely the jeep will be up at the house and the relatively light teardrop will be at the back. Although that must be a fairly full or heavy built 8' teardrop to hit 2400 lbds.

    What geographic location are we talking?
     
  2. Kyle Rogers
    Joined: May 2021
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    Location: 98612

    Kyle Rogers Junior Member

    Ok more details on my goals and priorities =)

    Reason i bought my pumpkin (the jeep)
    F*** roads. Ill drive wherever the **** i want (except into the columbia river)

    Reason i built the camper:
    "F*** rent ill live wherever the **** i want. Except in the columbia river"

    Reason i want a landing craft for my pumpkin and camper:
    "F*** dirt. Ill drive and camp in the columbia river."

    Also.... I got a vasectomy because freedom. I moved across the country to sever all the things holding i was holding onto. If it werent for my pumpkin i would be one of those guys that holds a sign that says "im a hobo and im not stupid enough to give hobos money."

    Ok bad joke.

    But why limit my offroading to on landing?

    I love my jeep.
     
  3. Kyle Rogers
    Joined: May 2021
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    Location: 98612

    Kyle Rogers Junior Member

    Ok so going to hawaii is not really feasible. We can rule that out. What if the jeep nosed in to the rear but the pilot house was up front above the camper with a room for kitchen/head/etc above the jeep. So it could be shorter and wider by stacking the necessary stuff above the parking deck? Would that be pacific coast-able or just river-able?
     
  4. comfisherman
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Alaska

    comfisherman Senior Member

    Pacific coast is a tough one.

    1. It has a a highway that runs its entire travelable length

    2. All its rivers have access roads along their lenghts...

    3. Next stop Guam.... it's not until Canada where you get to protected waters enough to fart around on protected waters.


    These threads, actually this forum has a wide range of application of advice. From dreamers postulating on ideas from the middle of Arizona, to guys actively building boats (typing this from a boatyard sitting on a bucket eating lunch next to my current build).

    Sometimes it's hard for response to tell which is which.
     
  5. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Surprisingly Arizona is a major boating center.

    K-R
    There's a dimensional problem.
    All vessels require a larger road tow vehicle than said vessel can safely float.

    Your best bet is to convert an amphibious infantry assault vehicle. As a bonus, is all F-Y attitude. I'll go wherever I want.

    Correction
    A canoe could be towed by and carry a folding bicycle. Suspect that it may be a bit too minimal.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2021
  6. Kyle Rogers
    Joined: May 2021
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    Location: 98612

    Kyle Rogers Junior Member

    I like math. Lets have fun

    10000 pound total mass needs 276480 cubic inches of displacement.

    At 18 inches of depth and a camper/jeep length of 300 inches that means the boat would need to be only 51.2 inches wide.....

    If we divided that into 2 we have 26.6 inches. So if i had 2 - 300 inch long pontoons that were 26.6 inches wide with a jeep mass of 4200, camper mass of 2000, and a boat mass of 3800 pounds then the floats will sit 18 inches deep in the water. If its a catamaran design and the floats sit outside the 74 inches so the jeep sits bwteenn the floats means

    300 inches long x 125.2 inches wide (74"+51.2") minimum. Would sit 18 inches deep in the water.

    So far with that in mind does 18 inches sound guestimate good for depth? If it sits 18 inches deep (jeep and camper can fjord 18 inches easy) how tall above water should the walls go for safe coastal navigation vs safe columbia river navigation?
     
  7. comfisherman
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Alaska

    comfisherman Senior Member

    That's pretty light for a structure capable of hauling a jeep and a trailer in much more than a lake. Would guess you would need some decent free board to have a self bailing deck. Landing craft that don't self bail seem loose favor pretty quick. Guessing a 30 foot waterline as an absolute minimum for a hull to get a speed worth bothering. Even then your looking at hull speeds in the 6s.

    The Columbia is a lot different from the Columbia river bar. The interesting thing about the west coast is that almost all vehicle legal beaches have road access, but would be logistics nightmares to make a landing. Puget sound being the obvious exception, granted much of the available islands are private access.

    Landing crafts were all the rage up here for many years, and in some areas still are. But much of the land is going non motorized and with it the landing crafts are going away.

    Might be tenable in bc. And certainly in southeast alaska.
     
  8. Robert Biegler
    Joined: Jun 2017
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    Location: Trondheim

    Robert Biegler Junior Member

    Would the landing craft actually give you more freedom? It would be too large to tow behind the jeep, so any time you want to travel on land, you have to find some place where you can safely and legally leave the landing craft. Its fuel efficiency would be appalling, so if most of the distance you travel is by landing craft, it will cost you. Someone has built an amphibious caravan, so if you mostly want camping convenience, and only occasionally go onto the water, that might be an option. If water is more important, you could tow a boat, and use it as a less convenient caravan. Or carry a folding or inflatable kayak. The thing that would give you maximal freedom in choosing travel routes would be an amphibious vehicle, like one of those:

    Fuel efficiency on water would be even worse than that of the landing craft.

    I would have sworn that such vehicles could only be good for protected waters. I certainly wouldn't take one offshore. And this story still doesn't change my mind, but perhaps you accept higher risks than I would:
     
    Dejay likes this.
  9. Kyle Rogers
    Joined: May 2021
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    Location: 98612

    Kyle Rogers Junior Member

    I work 150 feet from the columbia river in a town of 500 people.

    My jeep will never be replaced.

    There are several spots i xan drive my jeep into the river. So loading the boat would not be a problem.

    The town mooring pier is 200 yards from my office.

    The marina is 1 mile up the road.

    Analogy: it would be more efficient to cut trees down with a chainsaw. You should definitely cut your hand off and upgrade to a chainsaw

    The jeep stays.
     
  10. comfisherman
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Alaska

    comfisherman Senior Member

    I'll circle back to the original post just for kicks, 4th inline for a forklift so have a free minute.

    Can a craft be made to minimalist standards that will hold a jeep and a teardrop trailer.... absolutely. Look no further than the Higgins boats. 36 foot glass landing crafts with a 10 foot beam. Could land a few guys and a jeep with a fair degree of success on several beaches in France. Still a lot kicking around. Actually a hull is on the Anchorage craigslist for 800$ as we speak.

    Something like that would be about right. Not tremendously hard to build, its not a racing catamaran. Just a pointy barge with high sides and a ramp. Actually the 36 foot length is about right. 15 foot jeep, trailer, outboard space and room for ramp hardware. Maybe could shorten it a bit but it's pretty close to optimal.

    Now to construction, most up here are made in aluminum but that seems to put off the DIY guys a lot. Usually the DIY guys end up with glass over ply, usually done poorly and doesn't last but hey bad ideas shouldn't.... so it all works out.

    Thicken the keel, landing craft keels take more abuse that you can possibly imagine. Don't skimp on deck thickness, at some point you will have a steep beach and loose some layers to jeep tires.

    The biggest issue is this. Your location. The Oregon coast and Columbia river are very developed with roads, 200 years of logging mean the aerial view is astounding. If you can legally drive on it.... there is a road. That's a lot more than can be said of the beaches in the area. Until you get to Puget sound north it doesn't get much better.

    Is it possible..... yes..... is it a good idea...... no.
     
  11. Kyle Rogers
    Joined: May 2021
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    Kyle Rogers Junior Member

    GREAT! Im sold!

    I hate the meta. Social norms are boring Engineering norms are worse. And food norms are the most outrageous thing in the world.

    So. Possible but outrageous = fun.

    Ill start searching for a dock.
     
  12. comfisherman
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Alaska

    comfisherman Senior Member

    Post pics when you're done.
     
  13. Kyle Rogers
    Joined: May 2021
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    Location: 98612

    Kyle Rogers Junior Member

    Not my style. Ill post pics when i start ha ha
     

  14. comfisherman
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: Alaska

    comfisherman Senior Member

    Either one works for me. The boat start to finish ratio has got to be 10:1, that's why I specified but either one is interesting
     
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