Microwaving wood for bending, spring steel former

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by rwatson, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    This might be interesting to a few people. Its been mentioned a few times on this forum, but seeing it makes it more understandable to me.

    Not only does he use a microwave for 'steaming' the timber, but has an innovative 'steel and jig' setup for forming the bend.

    Some good comments in the Youtube thread about soaking and heating times as well.

    The use of spring steel as a backing for tight wood bends is a good trick to remember on its own.

     
  2. Lawrence101
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    Location: canada

    Lawrence101 Junior Member

    Looks like the "spring steel backing" is actually a shop ruler :D
    Another good use for it tho , I have one just like it .

    L
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A steel backer is a common practice when bending.
     
  4. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    I have a similar homemade tool, but the form part is stationary on the backer board, and the metal strap is a length of plumbers metal strap with a layer of foam backed tape. It gives I think a better feel for the stress on the wood since I typically have both hands on the wood being bent (on the outside of the metal strap).

    I just boil the wood, you can put long lengths into a big pot, leave end you are not working out of the water. If I am curving both ends I work one end at a time. I have steam bent six foot long ribs this way. boiling is a lot more forgiving of defects in the wood, I have very few splits and failures due to grain run-out and other gain defects.

    Not sure how useful the mircowave is for parts longer than about a foot.
     
  5. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

  6. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

  7. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: California

    troy2000 Senior Member


  8. Outlaw45
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Olympia,WA

    Outlaw45 Senior Member

    thats a craftsman. wow

    Outlaw
     
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