Marine Grade Steel & welding rods

Discussion in 'Materials' started by satoshis, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. satoshis
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Japan

    satoshis Junior Member

    Hello.
    I am quite new to this forum. I am involved in building a steel-hull sailing boat, or two, which has rather strange requirements.
    One can visit our website to see what's it all about.
    I am looking for information regarding the marine grade steel plates and the welding rods to go along with the construction.

    Could someone help?

    S^2
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

  3. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: Hobart

    pdwiley Senior Member

    Reads like disguised spam for the website to me.

    Incidentally there's nothing new about non-fossil fuelled vessels, in fact up to the 1800s and right up to WW2, there were fleets of them transporting cargo around the world. So claims about 'new, non-polluting' technology are just a joke.

    If you really wanted to be 'green' and only use renewable resources, you wouldn't be using steel, PV panels and synthetics anyway, as ALL of them are derivatives of the extractive fossil-fuelled industries. Go back to the timber tall ships.

    PDW
     
  4. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    PDW, don't be such a party pooper. If you're suspicious like me, and want legal details on the enterprise to clear up your doubts generated by their website, here they are... http://www.npo-hiroba.or.jp/
     
  5. satoshis
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Japan

    satoshis Junior Member

    Thank you Mr. Ad Hoc!
    Unfortunately I have not had time to read through the sections I need to go over, but I hope you gentlemen do not mind my asking seemingly stupid questions. As I stated I am quite new to this, even though I had sailed on my friends' sailboats before. As for the certification, theough I am not sure to what extent, Germanischer Lloyd is going to sponsor this vessel building.

    As for the criticism posted by Mr. pdwily, I do share similar thoughts in that it will take something like 600 to 800 times the weight of a microchip to produce a microchip in fossil fuel as well as 32 liters of water, or more. ECO, my bottom, yes. While my colleagues and I hold such sentiment, we think it can be a slightly better solution than to transport goods while spewing enormous amount of pollution; 16 of the largest class diesel container ships, exclude the super ship Mersk just started use, put out about the same amount of pollutants all the vehicles in the world put out annually. (So, we found out.)

    As for the legitimacy of the organization pointed out by Mr. SamSam, here is a better Link. Unfortunately, it is all in Japanese. We also are recognized by appropriate French authority too.

    Anyway, thank you for taking time to read my post and I hope you will not mind my asking more questions in near future with my poor American English.

    S^2
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2013
  6. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Where did you find that out? Who exactly is suggesting that those 16 ships are using half of all crude oil derived fossil fuels used for transport annually ? That's not actually a sensible suggestion.

    Go here for GL rules

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/cl...r-lloyd-gl-rules-free-28404-2.html#post647307
     
  7. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    If you click here:
    https://exchange.dnv.com/publishing/RulesHSLC/2012-01/

    And go to Part2, Ch 2, "Metallic Materials" You can download the pdf of the rules.

    DNV & GL are now becoming one Class society. Thus these rules will be sufficient for your questions.

    Where in Japan are you??..I am in Kobe.
     
  8. satoshis
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Japan

    satoshis Junior Member

    Thanks for leading me to the right section of the large document set.
    I'm in Tokyo. You're in Kobe???!!! I had no idea!

    Thank you.
     
  9. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Yup, just a short 3hour Shinkansen ride away :)
     
  10. satoshis
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Japan

    satoshis Junior Member

    Thanks very much for the link to the GL document. Anyhow, I don't think the fuels are divided up that way; the land transportation gets the cleanest part and the marine fuel is from the "bottom of the barrel" so to speak.
    Link Dr. James Corbett and others from Scandinavia wrote the first round of reports.
    I guess I was wrong to suggest the figure excluded the super cargoes, but they actually are the subject of the "16 largest" bit. I think the findings and the reports came out about 2004., as far as I can tell.

    S^2
     
  11. satoshis
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Japan

    satoshis Junior Member

    I combed through the documents causing more confusion on my part. I guess it is more to do with designs but I do have further question;

    When designing a "cargo" sail boat, does hull stress analysis include when the boat is out of water and having full load? Because the boat we're trying to build is supposed to be able to beach land with the load on board and I could not find anything to do with this "beach-landing" kind of things. <Should this be in the design forum?>

    Thank you.
     
  12. satoshis
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Location: Japan

    satoshis Junior Member

    Quite right. So, are there many shipyards in Kobe?
     

  13. richard gray
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: port coquitlam

    richard gray Junior Member

    weld

    You can weld with a low hydrogen rod or high tensile wire 70,000 . sg inch. but watch restricted joints, like inserts must be radiused at corners . back step weld sequence. when plating only tack one plate to frames and add next plate and weld seam before tacking to frame to avoid buckling frame from seam shrinkage. just saddle the frame or clips to hold frame to plate then weld seam do not tack weld the insert plates all around. this is restriction. the last butt or seam is always restricted, so backstop welds, multi pass as you progress along seam. bevel plate edges inside and vee out for for outside weld to finish
     
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