Marchaj's Aero-Hydrodynamics

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Grant Nelson, Oct 2, 2008.

  1. Grant Nelson
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 210
    Likes: 12, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 163
    Location: Netherlands

    Grant Nelson Senior Member

    Hi all, I have the 1988 edition of Marchaj's Aero-Hydrodynamics. I am wondering if much has changed since then, or in other words, can I still use this book as one of the best references on all the topics, or is something missing or just plain wrong after 20 years of advancement in the industry?

    If there are short comings, any suggestions on how to fill the gap?

    Thanks!

    Grant
     
  2. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
    Posts: 2,004
    Likes: 209, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2917
    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Grant,

    I still use an original edition from 1979, and I used this to teach a class in aero-hydrodynamics for small craft design at a small college in Rhode Island back in the mid-1980s. As far as I am aware, all of the science in Marchaj's book is still valid. For the 1988 edition, nothing was deleted from the 1979 edition. Things were added and miscellaneous errors were corrected. Most of the progress in the science of aero and hydrodynamics has been in developing better tools for analysis, most specifically Computational Fluid Dynamics, or CFD. The principles of wind tunnel testing and model tank testing are all the same.

    You can safely rely on this extremely good and useful book--one of my favorites.

    Eric
     
  3. Grant Nelson
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 210
    Likes: 12, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 163
    Location: Netherlands

    Grant Nelson Senior Member

    Thanks Eric, I will keep it then ;-)
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.