Looking for suggestions for a good "stream" boat

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by DrKungPao, Jul 23, 2008.

  1. DrKungPao
    Joined: Jul 2008
    Posts: 24
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    Location: Idaho

    DrKungPao Junior Member

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    I've been searching around here to see if I can come up on any threads that deal with this and I can't seem to. If someone knows of one and would like to point me in that direction I would be thankful. Otherwise, here goes.

    I would like to build a boat to use in the local stream that runs through our city. Its fairly shallow, 4-5 feet in the middle and at points near the side it can be about 1 foot. It doesn't have a really fast running current, but its not a snails pace either. I would like to be able to take my two daughters in it to do some exploring so it would need to hold about 400 lbs or 3 people.

    Am I describing a canoe? Does anyone have a favorite kit supplier in this catergory? Things to keep in mind etc?

    Thanks in advance. Much appreciated!

    I would prefer to buy a pre-existing kit since this will be my first time at boat building.
     
  2. lazeyjack

    lazeyjack Guest

    yes but a wide one, because you have no room to use oars, so a wide flat bottomed canoe with a good degree of stability, , how old is family?
     
  3. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    If you didn't require a kit this would probably be a great boat for you:

    http://www.jemwatercraft.com/StudyPlans/BuccaneerXW16StudyPlans.htm

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    Kits only save you the hassle of drawing lines on the wood and cutting on the lines, and that's not a difficult task. The designer has his own forum too, so maybe you wouldn't need a kit since you can ask questions there if you get stuck on something.

    :)
     
  4. DrKungPao
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Location: Idaho

    DrKungPao Junior Member

    Lazeyjack my oldest is 15 and youngest is 8. Both girls. I like trying to find things to do that we can all be includded with. This project is going to be that way from start to finish cuz im going to have them help me build the boat too!

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    I went down to the stream last night and would have to agree that the wider and flater the bottom the better, within reason. Im thinking something like this would probably be the ticket. I dont want to have to pull a squiggly 8 yr old out of the water cuz she couldnt sit still. (altho it might be an inevitability anyways) :D

    That boat looks really good Kengrome except I dont think I would be able to fit us all in there. I was thinking about what you said regarding the kit also. I've built alot of skateboard ramps, tables, etc before. I'm sure I could do this without the kit also.
     
  5. kengrome
    Joined: Jul 2006
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    Location: Gulf Coast USA

    kengrome Senior Member

    Hi DrKungPao,

    Actually the Buccanneer X-tra Wide is plenty big enough for the three of you. It's up to you of course, but here are some other things to consider that I did not mention previously:

    1- If you want a boat that's going to keep the girls occupied (sailboats are great for this but a sailboat is impractical in your situation) you might think about getting a boat they can paddle themselves. The Buccanneer X-tra Wide would be a great boat for this purpose. You'd sit in the middle and put a girl on each end, and you would all have your own paddles.

    None of you would be moving around much of course, so if this is a priority you'll be better off with a wider rowboat like the one in your picture. But if the girls are satisfied to stay in their seats most of the time, they would have a lot of fun paddling this boat themselves -- with you "along for the ride" in the middle seat, helping to steer and fend off until they get the hang of it.

    Kids like to help when they see adults doing things, and they like to keep occupied with physical activities too. In a typical rowboat only one person can row at a time. If this is usually you, the girls cannot help so they will have nothing to do physically to keep themselves occupied, and then they may get bored and want to 'go home' sooner than you'd like.

    2- Although the Buccanneer X-tra Wide is a bit more complicated to build than some other wide canoes, its unique bottom makes it an *extremely* stable boat. Matt (the designer) mentions this boat's similarity to the Gheenoe canoes ([FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]"If you've ever dreamed of owning a Gheenoe, here's your chance to build one that is lighter and will move more efficiently.")[/FONT] ... and there's a very good reason why people dream of Gheenoes -- they are exceptionally stable precisely because of their bottom shapes.

    Good luck with whatever boat you choose. I'm sure you'll enjoy the experience of building and boating with your girls!

    :)
     

  6. DrKungPao
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Location: Idaho

    DrKungPao Junior Member

    Kengrome,

    These are all really good things to think about. Especially the part of engaging the kids in the entire process (includding rowing etc.) Also the narrower profile of a canoe seems to make more sense at some points along this stream. Hmmmmm... Decisions decisions decisions. (all really fun ones though of course!)

    I will let you all know what I decide when I finally do. Thanks so much for all the input!
     
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