Looking for lumber here's my list..

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by icemanwillis, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    according to what I need whats the best place to buy this wood either Mahogany or douglas fir. as noted this is the finished sizes so I take it I should buy bigger size and cut it down. whats my best option? thanks for any help

    Solid Timber..... Sizes are finished sizes.


    12x30mm (1/2"x1 1/4") (washboard slides) - 6m (19')
    12x92mm (1/2"x3 5/8") (framing to centreplate casing) - 2m (7')
    16x16mm (5/8"x5/8") (hatch trims) - 2m (7')
    20x56mm (3/4"x2 3/16") (toerail bases) - 2m (7')
    22x22mm (7/8"x7/8") (hull stringers, framing, joinery cleats) - 149m (487')
    22x28mm (7/8"x1 1/8") (framing to centreplate casing) - 2m (7')
    22x26mm (7/8"x1 1/32") (cockpit locker framing) - 2m (7')
    22x32mm (7/8"x1 1/4") (deck stringers, framing) - 66m (217')
    22x41mm (7/8"x1 5/8") (cockpit locker framing) - 2m (7')
    22x44mm (7/8"x1 3/4") (berth bearers, toerails) - 13m (44')
    28x110mm (1 1/8"x4 5/16") (framing to centreplate casing) - 1m (4')
    32x50mm (1 1/4"x2") (hatch coaming) - 3m (10')
    42x55mm (1 5/8"x2 5/32") (hatch garage front) - 1m (4')
    44x44mm (1 3/4"x1 3/4") Triangular fillet (cockpit locker framing) - 2m (7')
    44x76mm (1 3/4"x3") (Keel, engine well kerb) - 13m (44')
    80x80mm (3 3/16"x3 3/16") (Samson post) - 0.3m (1')[/SIZE]
     
  2. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    translate it all into the number of board feet, and species. Native hardwood species are dirt cheap right now. I can get just about anything for $2 a foot or less.
     
  3. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    then basicly I need 872' of board needing that footage how do I figure the size of actual board I need I'm guessing I have to buy diffrent sizes at a time...... I am going to go with douglas fir.
     
  4. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    I also need 36 sheets of 4x8 10mm Okoume plywood know of a good place to order this??
     
  5. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    pre cut is expensive. I could do it but it adds a lot to your cost. Your better off milling it yourself, but as I said if you want, I'm sure we can work something out, I'm not doing much at the moment and it might keep me busy for a while. Douglas fir, are you sure about that, its heavy and personally I hate that stuff :D you better double check all your design and materials calls if your going to get this milled out of house.

    Typically there is variety of materials involved, not just one species. Double check your order and then check it again. Also consult some other members about your design and the material your planing to build it out of.

    what are you building and why such heavy material

    I don't buy much plywood but I'll check monday on my price these days
     
  6. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    well that may not be the best wood for me then. it calls for either meranti, Mahogany, douglas fir I am building the Cape Henry 21 by dix designs heres the whole list

    MARINE PLYWOOD 1,22x2,44m (4'x8') (preferably Gaboon or Okoume plywood)
    10mm (3/8") - 36 sheets

    SAWN PINE (for building stocks etc)
    25X125mm (1"x5") (rails) - 17m
    50x50mm (2"x2") (bulkhead legs) - 12m
    75x75mm (3"x3") (posts) - 5m

    SOLID TIMBER (meranti, mahogany, Douglas fir or similar, selected, free of knots, shakes fractures etc. Sizes are finished sizes.
    12x30mm (1/2"x1 1/4") (washboard slides) - 6m (19')
    12x92mm (1/2"x3 5/8") (framing to centreplate casing) - 2m (7')
    16x16mm (5/8"x5/8") (hatch trims) - 2m (7')
    20x56mm (3/4"x2 3/16") (toerail bases) - 2m (7')
    22x22mm (7/8"x7/8") (hull stringers, framing, joinery cleats) - 149m (487')
    22x28mm (7/8"x1 1/8") (framing to centreplate casing) - 2m (7')
    22x26mm (7/8"x1 1/32") (cockpit locker framing) - 2m (7')
    22x32mm (7/8"x1 1/4") (deck stringers, framing) - 66m (217')
    22x41mm (7/8"x1 5/8") (cockpit locker framing) - 2m (7')
    22x44mm (7/8"x1 3/4") (berth bearers, toerails) - 13m (44')
    28x110mm (1 1/8"x4 5/16") (framing to centreplate casing) - 1m (4')
    32x50mm (1 1/4"x2") (hatch coaming) - 3m (10')
    42x55mm (1 5/8"x2 5/32") (hatch garage front) - 1m (4')
    44x44mm (1 3/4"x1 3/4") Triangular fillet (cockpit locker framing) - 2m (7')
    44x76mm (1 3/4"x3") (Keel, engine well kerb) - 13m (44')
    80x80mm (3 3/16"x3 3/16") (Samson post) - 0.3m (1')

    SOLID TIMBER FOR SPARS (Clear Douglas fir, selected, free of knots, shakes fractures etc. Sizes are finished sizes.
    18x43mm (0.69"x1.71") (Mast staves) - 55m (180')
    55x55mm (2.17"x2.17") (Gaff) - 4m (14')
    55x82mm (2.17"x3.23") (Boom) - 4m (14')
    76x76mm (3"x3") (Mast inserts) - 1.5m (5') (Can be laminated ex smaller)
    82x82mm (3.23"x3.23") (Bowsprit) - 2.4m (8') (Can be laminated ex smaller)

    RESIN & GLASS (for coatings and reinforced areas)
    Epoxy resin (low viscosity 100% solids) - 50kg (110lb)
    75mm (3") Wide tape - 18m (60')
    100mm (4") Wide tape - 12m (40')
    450g/sq.m Chopped strand mat - 4sq.m (43sq.ft)
     
  7. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    well I'm about to get shot at and your about to get ten people starting with a guy named Troy and probably not ending with a guy named Par come on here and tell you Dougy's fine. So take some time and see what kinda feedback you get on what your building. I'm more of a wood guy but these guys mostly are very experienced boat builders. I just detest Dougy so no worries. They're going to harass you with questions and then see if thats really the boat that fits your needs.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    key questions are what are you going to use the boat for and where But it looks to me like a day sailor/weekender. Nice boat pick. Should be fun to build. Your really way better off slicing and dicing your own wood though

    I'd recommend building just about anything out of native hardwoods. excellent strength and rot resistance but thats just me.
     
  8. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    It would be for a day sailor or weekend fun. I would slice and dice my own wood Im trying to figure out what size wood to buy to start with.
     
  9. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

  10. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    well your options are measured in quarters, as in quarters of an inch. Mill cut rough typically 4/4 and 8/4 so thats one inch and two inchs thick. Plains down to 3/4 and 7/4 but if its cut with a nice sharp blade you can usually clean it us and only loose 1/8 if your good. If you want a mill to slice it any different that those two dimensions your going to end up paying a premium, even just 8/4 and they bump the price. Most back woods sawyers don't even know there is another size other than 4/4

    Nice boat.

    You can laminate for larger pieces, it ends up stronger that way anyway. Just use the right glue. Which in the case of a boat is almost always epoxy.

    Oh and your close to Cyprus to so if you went that direction your transportation costs would be minimal. Dougy comes from the pacific NW and you'd be paying about 12~15 hundred to get it cross country.
     
  11. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    so if the company calls for meranti, mahogany, or Douglas I dont have to use that? if cost would come down with cyprus I may go that route........
     
  12. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    the materials are picked for there weight and strength characteristics as well as rot resistance. You can change them around some if you stick to materials with similar characteristics. Several of the more common native hardwoods have excellent rot resistance. Cherry and Walnut for instance are both great materials. White oak is very common in boat building, just go through the connected lines site and see what you can do. Mahogany would break the bank. Besides Dougy finishes poorly anyway so if your going with a clear finish you might as well be looking at a nice smooth something rather than a wavy piece of heavy grained Dougy. But once again these guys are going to glitch when they find this thread and discover me spreading my prejudices around.
     
  13. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    Thanks Boston for the help and advice.
     
  14. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    hey no worries and best of luck. You'd be better off doing your own cutting but if you want help, the mill will do it for you and save shipping it all over the country. I'd love to help but I see your pretty far away. No sense paying all that extra shipping. Besides building its half the fun.
     

  15. icemanwillis
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 17
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    Location: alabama

    icemanwillis Junior Member

    oh yeah thanks.
     
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