Looking for Guidance and Advice

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Reid Crownover, Sep 4, 2017.

  1. Reid Crownover
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Texas

    Reid Crownover Young Hustler

    My name is Reid, Im 17 and still in HS but the ocean is my passion and I have taken up a project building a 30' Aluminum Pilothouse boat. I am finishing up the design process but have a couple questions and need help.
    Transom?
    how to mount outboards?
    What is going to be required for the engines/stuff?
    How much structure do I have to weld into the hull for support (5086 h116 aluminum)?
    Is there someone that can just mentor me through this process(Everything)?
    Does my hull have to be rounded or can it be Origami looking because I am doing this by myself?
    If I was to cut out sheets to bend the hull out of how do I get dimensions based off of a lines plan?
    Is anyone going to the SNAME conference in Houston (If they still have it) in October?

    I also have a lot of questions about a career in Naval Arch if someone has advice or is willing to let me blow up their email with questions.
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Judging by your questions, you are in no position to even think about self designing an aluminum 30' motor yacht.. No offense intended, just an observation, based on your statements and questions. Naval Architecture is an engineering discipline, so hows you math and general study habits? Simply put, if you can get through a structural engineering course, you'll do fine in an NA course.

    About your questions, well there's so much to add, it's just not practical in this format (engineering, hydrodynamics, propulsion systems, class , USCG and other compliance requirements, etc.). As to mentoring, well this is possible, though I don't know anyone performing this task on a job by job basis. Learning a bachelors engineering degree level of information, seems well over the top for a single project, even if you do have plans for more. Then there's the practical nature of equipment installation, which typical classes don't teach, such as how to mount an outboard. These are learned through experience and study of manufacturer's documentation.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Do you have any pics/drawings to show of what you have done so far, Reid ?
     
  4. Dolfiman
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: NICE (France)

    Dolfiman Senior Member

  5. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    As you do not have a degree in either engineering or NA, you have not really designed a boat. You have probably sketched a set of lines as to what you want your boat to look like. Ie the actual design is more of the structural part of the process
    Lets assume that you have the cash to actually take this to completion. A simple 30 foot aluminum boat, depending on horsepower could easily cost $70,000 - 100,000 or more assuming you can weld (?)

    In order to facilitate the build, purchase a set of plans. You can expect to pay anywhere from 3000 to 5000 for a set where the DESIGN has been done. Structural etc. For this price, you will most likely get a CAD program whereby you can get the parts cut at an aluminum processor that will take months of effort off the build time and give you a chance of having something that will succeed.

    Then I would spend the $500 or so to purchase the ABYC Standards manual. At about 400 pages, you can research the many topics that you will have to deal with both from the systems and equipment build side and the compliance side.
    They will tell you what you need to do for electrical, fuel tanks, ventilation, visibility, just about everything (but not the structural part)

    Regarding what path that you want to take to become a Naval architect, consider taking Mechanical Engineering which will give you a grounding in strength of materials, electrical, hydrodynamics, dynamics, structural etc and then some time at a NA school. The reason being is that you would have the training then to find other jobs if a solid job in the NA field cannot be found. Ie more Mechanical engineering jobs around than NA. Ie you are spending your time, might as well
    have a solid fall back position.

    Locate a couple of NA firms in your area and see if the owner would consider an interview as to what the job entails, type of remuneration and at what stages of a career. Try to get on for summer or part time work to get a feel for what the job entails.

    Expect skepticism from people at this point due to your age, experience or lack there of, ability to fund, the ability to weld aluminum, etc but there are Naval Architects and engineers coming out of schools who probably started into their
    career with the same dreams and aspirations as you have, so go to it.

    Maybe Par would take you on, chuckle
     
  6. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    Likes: 172, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    Reid, attached files correspond to the transom of a 40' landing craft but maybe they give you an idea of how to solve the transom of your boat.
    If you need more help in relation to the structure of your boat, do not hesitate to contact me.
    Good luck
     

    Attached Files:

  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You should design and build a dingy to start with. For example, a 10 foot jon boat. That will give you a better idea of what you are getting into that a lot of theoretical knowledge from books.
     
  8. Reid Crownover
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 42
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    Location: Texas

    Reid Crownover Young Hustler

    Yea, here is some stuff I have put together I have an .STL also. Most of my stuff is hand drawn tho :(
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Reid Crownover
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 42
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    Location: Texas

    Reid Crownover Young Hustler

    Well, simply put AP Calculus is my favorite class and I have been able to teach myself skills such as welding and 3d modeling and quite a bit of ship geometry. I want to go into the field of Small craft design and build things such as Trawlers and Fishing Yachts. If you have any advice such as text books that can help or something please let me know. also If you want some drawings on my boat to look at let me know. Thanks.
     
  10. Reid Crownover
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Texas

    Reid Crownover Young Hustler

    Thank you for the response and the advice. I have been welding since I was 10 or so and can weld just about anything put in front of me. I have spent some time studying ship geometry or at least what I can find on the internet. I have a Lines plan that I ran by a Naval Arch. at A&M Galveston and he said they looked good. On the topic of the structure The "Frame" Supporting the hull should properly support the tensile strength of the sheet metal like any other metal working project I would imagine. Aluminum should bend on its own weight at .250 and .190 inches so my idea was to build and suspend my stations then plate aluminum onto the sides of the hull. After that I have some floor plans set up for my pilothouse and cabin. Since I will be using my own metal working skills and used motors and what not I am looking at a budget around 40,000 or so (I'm a broke High school kid). But I have a job that I have been saving up from for about a year and My dad said he would help me pay for it if I was to build a small aluminum boat first to prove concept.

    Do you know of any textbooks that could possibly help me with my career path?
     
  11. Reid Crownover
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Texas

    Reid Crownover Young Hustler

    Thanks for those drawings, those look heavy for what Im doing, this is a planing hull... I have some lines plans I will send you. What kind of program did you use to draw up those transoms? I have a student version of autodesk Inventor and Autocad but thats not exactly ideal for this application from what I understand.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 782
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Reid,
    I admire your enthusiasm, don't let it fade.
    Books, mentors, internet, experience.
    Follow PAR's advice.
     
  13. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 5,687
    Likes: 172, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    In fact, the 40 'LC transom is a bit strong but it indicates that transom can be reinforced simply with a plate of sufficient thickness and some brackets that transmit the loads on the transom to the rest of the structure of the bottom.
    I always use AutoCAD to make all my drawings and, in many occasions to perform the calculations of naval architecture.
    Regarding your boat, I think it would be good to keep the maximum breadth in the chine until the stern.
     

  14. Reid Crownover
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 42
    Likes: 0, Points: 6
    Location: Texas

    Reid Crownover Young Hustler

    In my plans I have the transom to be a .250 inch plate backed with 6061 angled aluminum framing. However I believe I am going to have to angle the transom in order to mount the jack plate and outboards on it? or can the jack plate and Outboards be mounted on a flat transom? My email is reidcrown@gmail.com if you want to message me directly.
     
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