Length of glass strands !

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by tunnels, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    E matt Binders are a real problem as a fast brew of resin will not has enough time to desolve the binder and so you have bundles of fibres that are only held together on the outside and the inner parts have no resin at all .
    The other down side is the binder also asorbs moisture from the air and so holds that moisture and slows down the resin in hi humidity places ! You wil have notices i always go on about humidity in a lot of my postings . Its a real killer and not to many people take any notice of the moisture in the air things

    :D
     
  2. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    Yes, I have spent most of my career in So Florida it is always above 80% Humidity, And I keep a meter handy,you would really be surprised how fast moisture is adsorbed,on my glass racks for example, there are trash bags on the spindles that get pulled over the glass rolls at night and the rolls are never opened until ready to be used,

    The guys that use plywood, you check the top sheet 26% or more.
     
  3. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    90 %of the work i do is strict survey standards and Humidity is the hardest thing for they guys to come to grips with . Cant see it so they dont think about it .
    Tahiti was way in the hi 90s to 100% all the time .
    NewZealand is up there from 80% and above most of the time ,
    China is ranging from 65% to the 90s and no two days are ever the same .
    Korea on the other hand was in the low 30s for long periods while we were building the plugs( Even got down to 20% a few times in the winter):D:p , moulds and 8 fully completed match racing Yachts so was a blessing to work inside a building inside a tent at a constant 23c ,24/7 . :)
     
  4. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
    Posts: 661
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 84
    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    I know what you mean,Kuwait was 14% LOL things dried out there!
     
  5. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Herman Senior Member

    I believe LLoyds keeps a limit of 70% maximum.

    Last time I infused some RIBS under Lloyds survey, and the surveyor was moaning about the high humidity (71%).

    Fortunately with infusion the humidity level is less critical, as long as you are able to pull the moisture out of the materials. When you vacuum things down, at times the pressure stagnates at 20 mbar (approx), then refuses to go down. And all of a sudden the pressure goes down again (can take hours though). This is the moisture flashing off from the materials.

    Drying the materials in an oven before use can be a great help as well. Only very little people do this.
     

  6. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    70%is the usual max . To dry materials Just tent and dehumidify ! Dont need to heat !Works reguardless of temprature !!
     
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