Last voyage for Costa Concordia cruise ship

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by daiquiri, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    What the Hell are you talking about? I said it was only a guess. Don't make me key in French!
     
  2. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    He won't get it in French either .... maybe Chinese? Martian?
     
  3. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    C'est le ton qui fait la chanson.
     
  4. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

  5. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    I try to keep my comments to the topic - last voyage for CC cruise ship.
    In boat and ship building it is a good idea to avoid guessing. If you guess or cheat then, the result will always be an accident. I am sure about it.
    It will be interesting if topic - last voyage for CC cruise ship - will ever be completed or if the wreck will remain on the rocks after unsuccessful salvage. Just because salvors managed to roll up right wreck in deeper waters is no guarantee of anything.
    It seems they have only got the lights running in the deckhouse above water since up righting. Aircon and toilets there will never run, though. :p
     
  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    What is the best website chronicling the CC salvage ?.
     
  7. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    One site nobody should not visit ever is the heiwa web site.
    Yes the heiwa character has also a conspiracy theory on 911.
    The kind of guy who knows everything from is little rented room.
     
  8. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Heiwa, there was recently on TV Discovery Channel a program about the raising of the CC which addresses the broken bow problem. As previously noted, a flotation collar is designed to attach to the bow and secure it to the hull. Il ya peril en la demeure.
     
  9. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    TV Discovery Channel! Expert on wreck salvage? :D:p
    As you apparently have visited my popular web site, you should know by now, that I consider most info by TV reporters about CC as rubbish.
    Evidently the 'blister - a flotation collar around the bow does not secure a flipping bow to the rest of the wreck. It just reduces the total force. The waves will still move the bow up and down. And it seems T/M tries to fit some system to prevent that. I wish them luck.
    Most ships with cracks in the hull at sea sooner or later break into two parts. If you visit my web site I give some examples. M/T Prestige and M/T Erika. But there are many more.
    You know - when it happens both tanker parts finally sink and oil spills and ... authorities blame the Masters for it! The Masters should prevent their tankers breaking apart and collect the oil. Do you think it is reasonable?
     
  10. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    "The blister tanks are like a large cervical collar you put on a patient with a spinal injury, like a neck brace, that will stabilize the whole bow during the parbuckling and reduce any chance of further damage," said Nick Sloane.
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    There is always risk. On the other hand, the Med saw lots of sinkings during WW2. Do you still see any of that WW2 oil?
     
  12. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Yes, the blister stabilized the bow during parbuckling! No doubt about that. But now the bow and blister is moving so another system is being fitted to retain the bow in place and stop movements. And they better fit it quickly to avoid seeing the whole bow dropping off. Remember Erika, Remember Prestige.
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Tant va la cruche à l'eau qu'enfin elle se brise.

    Seul le temps nous dira.
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member


  15. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    Too Big to Sail? Cruise Ships Face Scrutiny | NEW YORK TIMES
     
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