Last question for a while; Steel framed cabin with aluminum pontoons

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by parkland, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 700
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member


    Most are to big to tow; all are gasoline, most are in rough shape.
    I can get 2 brand new 40 ft 36" diameter pontoons to me, shipping included, for 15k$.

    I have access to lots of guys that are steel wizards, including one that previously built 5th wheel cargo trailers, so that is a huge plus.

    Yes, it will end up costing more than a boat from 20 to 30 years old.
     
  2. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 700
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member

    See comments inserted
     
  3. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
    Posts: 2,002
    Likes: 205, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2917
    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Parkland, I'd be interested to know your source--care to share it?

    Eric
     
  4. tomas
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 281
    Likes: 16, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 147
    Location: California

    tomas Senior Member

    Hello parkland

    I see that you've modified your original SOR to include folding pontoons, which reminded me of this patented, trailerable houseboat:

    (skip ahead to the 3:42 mark)

     
  5. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 700
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member


    A place in ontario, they make them there.
    I think a set of 35' long ones worked out to 11,000$
    They seemed reasonable anyways I thought.
    There are a couple companies there somewhere, and the one guy seems to be able to eat the shipping no matter what I've asked, so I assume he sells lots and plans on putting them on a truck with other pontoons.
    He said they can also make pontoons longer than the truck, and they just bolt together once you get them.

    The complete kit for a giant houseboat, was 99k$, and that was 2 70 ft pontoons, 48" I think it was, and all the aluminum decking to go with it. 16 ft wide.
    Would make a great start to an awesome houseboat!
     
  6. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
    Posts: 2,002
    Likes: 205, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 2917
    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Perhaps it's this one, U-Fabboats.com: http://www.u-fabboats.com/

    Eric
     
  7. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 700
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member

    I'm 99% sure I talked to a guy from there, and they seemed very good cost, and
    seemed like a very good place to get pontoons, from what I could tell.

    Ten again, just cause someone plans to build a boat, does not make them an expert.
     
  8. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 700
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member

    Certainly a neat idea!
    Surprised you don't see more of those boats floating around.
     
  9. boatbuilder41
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 159
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 56
    Location: panama city florida

    boatbuilder41 Senior Member

    There are many ways to fasten aluminum together. It seems to me that the most productive way to built your deck and cabin would be to use aluminum angle or square tubing and rivot sheet aluminun or vinyl to the framing.this will reduce the weight and stability issues .it will also be a lot cheaper than welding. Just use a sealer on the joints of your sheeting and overlap about 1 inch. Be sure to put a proper crown in your roof or top. This would be the best solution that I could think of. Weight,stability,and cost will be reduced to a minimum. Just check your local fastener supplier or hardware stores for a premium grade aluminum rivots. And a good qualityair rivot gun will make the job a breeze. Keeping things simple and cost efficent makes it a joy to build
     

  10. Ilan Voyager
    Joined: May 2004
    Posts: 1,215
    Likes: 128, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 758
    Location: Cancun Mexico

    Ilan Voyager Senior Member

    I do agree totally. You have plenty of structural water tight pop rivets used in aviation (expensive) but also for trucks (good price) in alu and stainless steel. Such structures are very strong and mounted with polyurethane sealant (which is also a glue) are totally tight and water proof. The tooling is very simple (mainly a miter saw for alu, a circular saw with a blade for alu, a drill, and a pneumatic pop riveter). And no problems of corrosion.

    For the beams you can find a lot of structural tubing in 6061 T6, from round, square to rectangular, plus a lot of profiles; angles, U, Z etc. As there is no welding, No problems of distortion, no HAZ and subsequent loss of resistance. A pontoon boat used on lakes and rivers has not the the same structural requirements of a sea boat, so it can be made entirely riveted and bolted with a structural monocoque floor that becomes a continuous beam.

    A bit longer to make than welding but fool proof. I have made good trailers in monocoque structure entirely riveted: after all a Boeing 747 is glued and riveted, not welded...
    You have also rather light insulating panels in galvanized sheet steel (gauge 28 to 30) painted with very strong polyester paint for light industrial construction that works very well with alu angles and rivets.

    Have a look on the big trailer industry items, it's a gold mine. The work of preparing the steel before paint, plus the primaries and anti corrosion paints is a hard, dirty and pretty expensive task. Take that in account with steel, everybody forgets this high expense.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.