Landing craft un-beaching

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Steve P, Mar 18, 2015.

  1. Steve P
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    Location: Scappoose, Oregon

    Steve P Junior Member

    Does anyone have a suggestion on how to get a small landing craft off the beach after taking on a load? It is possible to drop anchors off stern prior to beaching, and winch off. Or is there a better way for a hydraulic pusher to push the boat off the beach?:?:
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    In your area, load the landing craft at low tide.
     
  3. Steve P
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    Steve P Junior Member

    Thank you gonzo. A mechanical assist is needed if there is no tides. What I was referring to was any ideas on a mechical design of some type.
     
  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    ... and wait 6 hours until the next tide.
    Sometimes these boats throwing the anchor from the stern and with a winch, also located aft, pulling the cable, separated from the beach. Sorry if my English is not very good.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  5. Tad
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    The stern anchor is traditional, standard equipment on LCM's. Usually they used a Danforth type anchor because they usually landed on sand beaches. Pick an anchor appropriate to your area.

    LCManchor.JPG
     
  6. Steve P
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    Location: Scappoose, Oregon

    Steve P Junior Member

    Attached is my solution to a mechanical push to get off the beach for a small landing craft.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. TANSL
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    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    The idea is interesting but not sure that works. It is likely that instead of pushing the boat, the force exerted by the ramp will rotate the ship, which will remove the propeller out of the water. Maybe I'm wrong, I do not see clearly how this system can work.
     
  8. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Yes, it appears this folding bow ramp may lift up the bow, but lower the stern and cause the outboard motor to get stuck. You might explore the specs & accessories for the boats below. A stern winch doesn't sound like a bad idea. Just be sure you're not tearing up a coral bed with that anchor.

    http://www.nauticexpo.com/cat/workboats/utility-landing-crafts-PA-1549.html
     
  9. Steve P
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    Location: Scappoose, Oregon

    Steve P Junior Member

    Un beaching of landing craft

    Thank you all for your input. The type of anchor suggestion is very helpful. Present customer has decided to use one or two 8000 pound pull pick-up truck electric winchs off the stern and anchors. This certainly will be less expensive than a hydraulic bow door pusher. It will be interesting to see how this works.

    Steve P
    Boat designer
     
  10. tom kane
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Hamilton.New Zealand.

    tom kane Senior Member

    Could you have a hydraulic Hiab crane to do the pushing and pulling and loading and unloading.Drain diggers work that way and you will know that it will work.
    If it is not successful it can be sold.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2015
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    TANSL: There are two low and two high tides each day. The maximum wait would be less than six hours.
     
  12. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Thanks Gonzo, I've corrected my mistake. LOL
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  13. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If it is a rolling load, like a truck, you have the possible option of driving it in the direction you want the landing craft to move, then standing on the brakes. Requires nice judgement though ! Witnessed this happen several times on vehicle ferries that grounded on sand banks, repeated a few times till it re-entered navigable depth water. Obviously if there is no spare space on deck, it cannot be done.
     
  14. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    If you were planning on using hydraulics why not just have a ram or leg on each side with a foot on the end. Set it on an angle forward so it pushs the boat backwards . It would be a very simple linear movement that would have to work. And if the legs are mounted towards the aft end a bit they will lift the stern while moving the boat backwards.
     

  15. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    A Danforth with just line , no chain worked well for most of WWII.

    An old 2 speed sail boat winch (self tailing ?) would do it.
     
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