King starboard

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Klutchboy, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. Klutchboy
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    Klutchboy New Member

    Hi gentleman, Newbie here, need some advice, have a grady white 25'sailfish with the old ugly ( and rotten ) plywood panels at the Helm/cabin, ( not sure what you call this area ? ) was thinking of replacing with King starboard , will this work ? Currently seems to be 1/2"ply, should I go bigger ? 3/4" maybe ,keep hearing this stuff is not structural, the panels are only 38"X 42" any advice would be great, Thanks
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    It depends on what the plywood panels you're replacing are doping. Starboard is awfully heavy stuff, especially considering it's just decorative in nature. There are some uses for it and making a fileting table, it's great, but I think we'll need pictures of the area(s) before any constructive comments can be made.
     
  3. Klutchboy
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    Klutchboy New Member

    pics

    it would be to replace the panel to the left and right of the cabin door as seen in these pics, (not my boat but same )
     

    Attached Files:

  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    King Starboard has a soft surface and will look pretty shoddy in no time. It is great for cutting boards. Also, it is not cheaper than plywood.
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you skin the existing plywood with Starboard, you'll be fine, but replacement wouldn't be wise, as I think it's the cabin/cockpit bulkhead. Unfortunately, you can't glue Starboard. It can only be welded to itself or mechanically fastened (screws or bolts).

    You could skin the plywood with vinyl, acrylic, metal or one of a number of things, to change the look. You could also just seal and paint the plywood.
     
  6. Klutchboy
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    Klutchboy New Member

    the existing plywood is rotted out at the bottom so replacement is a must, should I go back in with marine grade ply and cover with epoxy ?
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well, yes, but you don't have to get married to the plywood finish. Paint is the cheapest route, though admittedly boring. An applique of some sort (vinyl, tile, metal, carpet etc.) are attractive options. Plywood rots because it's not protected and/or cared for. If it's epoxy encapsulated, it'll last a long time without care, though it'll last a lot longer with some care. Epoxied surfaces much be covered with paint, varnish or other UV coating.

    Make sure you brace the hull both athwart and in depth, so the hull doesn't change shape as the bulkhead is removed.
     
  8. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    The marina where i doing subcontracting at the moment uses lots of starboard, (not always appropriatly) and they love it, i have a hard time thinking of any place to use it because of its weight and the fact that it is not at all stiff, it needs close support as it will sag under its own weight. I would use BS1088 plywood epoxy encapsulated, or home made cored composite panels with the finish of choice.

    Steve.
     
  9. Klutchboy
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    Klutchboy New Member

    Forgive my ignorance but can you purchase the 1088 already epoxy encapsulated or do you have to epoxy it yourself, I am an excellent mechanic and can do basic bodywork and really basic fiberglass but most of the materials refered to on the website are new to me, I have used lots of 2 part epoxies and urethanes on concrete floors so I have a little knowledge ( dangerous, I know ! ) thanks to everyone for the education,
     

  10. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    No, you have to encapsulate it yourself, get the application guide from someone like systems three which will tell you how to use the materials but there are many good epoxies available online that are every bit as good for less money than the big advertisers. I use aeromarine which i like, others are Progressive, Raka, Epiglass,Maas.

    Steve.
     
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