jet powered canoe

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by muskymania, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. beachcraft
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    beachcraft Junior Member

    I'd like to know how much drag the jet intake adds and how easy it is to paddle one of these.

    Neither

    or a different one

    have a paddle along.
     
  2. portacruise
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    portacruise Senior Member

    Seems like draft, rapids terrain, and weight of boat are the things to consider. One good size rock, directly in the rapids path of travel would put an end to any jet boat travel.

    I just stand up to touch river bottom in my boat when I get close as I can get to the rapids and walk it upstream. A hand tow from shallow walkable river's edge also works. Easy to go around exposed rocks/obstructions if the rope tie is positioned so the front of the boat pulls toward the opposite bank. Rarely, I might have to get in knee deep to lift slightly to clear barriers. Something like this inflatable is lightweight, self bailing, and can be rapidly back packed in its deployed state: http://playak.com/article.php?sid=2273

    Porta
     
  3. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    I think that Mokai video is an old one. The latest one, Mokai in Action, shows a much speedier model--click on the listing "MOKAI in Action": http://www.mokai.com/mokai-in-a-minuteVideos.html.

    The jet pump inlet will create hardly any extra drag--that would not be a concern for me. Paddling the Mokai is done with either a canoe or kayak paddle. It is meant to be a powerboat, not necessarily a paddling boat, so you carry a paddle for emergencies.

    Eric
     
  4. muskymania
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    muskymania Junior Member

    This is my rough sketch as of now. Yes those are removable outriggers on the sides, I figured I would probably need those since I intend to stand and fish out of this narrow boat on calm stretches. My goal was to balance the weight as well as possible, any instructive criticism is appreciated.
     

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  5. cor
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Alaska

    cor Senior Member

    Check out the Alaska Outdoors Forum canoeing section.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/forumdisplay.php/18-Alaska-Canoeing

    There is a lot of info about powered canoes being used in lots of different types of rivers. Traditionally they were powered with an outboard on a lift. The lift has a long lever on it that allows you to adjust the depth of the motor while you are going. Many times the prop is protected with some kind of shroud. A skilled operator can run one through very shallow water.

    Lately many people are running "mud" motors on their canoes.

    A lot of the canoes do not have square sterns and they get around fine. For the best performance at speed a straight run aft (no upward curve to the keel) and a square stern needed. These features add to the drag when paddling.

    C.O.
     
  6. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Muskymania,

    What about a small jet-drive outboard.

    You could then lay it down, strapped in for your run downstream.

    You'd still need that small, flat transom to clamp it to.
     
  7. muskymania
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    muskymania Junior Member

    The smallest jet outboard is a 20hp which is much too heavy for a canoe and also jet outboards are significantly less effecient.
     
  8. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Sounds like you'll be retro-fitting and fabricating then.

    Post pictures along the way, these are great things to watch evolve.
     
  9. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    philSweet Senior Member

    less efficient than what?
     
  10. muskymania
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    muskymania Junior Member

    Jet outboards are less effecient than jet inboard.
     
  11. muskymania
    Joined: Nov 2012
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    muskymania Junior Member

    It may be a little while before I get started but I will try to post. I fully intended to do this project with a jon boat last summer but soon realized the river I would be using it in would eat a jon boat alive. A whitewater canoe should hold up much better
     
  12. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    I have used polysulphide caulk to seal against poly type materials. You will need to mechanically fasten the transom. You'ld be much better off to begin with a fiberglass canoe in terms of modifying it but I understand you might want the abuseability of a roto-molded canoe.
    No comments on the engine idea. For the transom, plywood comes to mind but mecanically fastening it would be difficult unless you also frame around, say a couple of inches around the edges.
    Then I guess you could use bronze nails with thin heads every two inches or so going into the frames. The pieces should all be coated with paint or epoxy before assembly.
    Have you thought of an electric motor... or a side-mount bracket? More than a couple of HP would be overkill.
     
  13. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Alan,

    He's going up class II & III river rapids.

    He's going to need more than a couple of HP.
     
  14. portacruise
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    portacruise Senior Member

    Yep, on the jon, even going down rapids, when rocky.

    Fine steering control will be critical, especially with a whitewater canoe. Rudders essentially useless and probably out of the question.

    Swamping danger with an open canoe, is a SOT/self bailing better?

    Porta

     

  15. larry sellers
    Joined: Sep 2012
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    Location: chico ca

    larry sellers Junior Member

    thoughts...small jet made from trash-pump (tractor supply, harbor freight?) suction uptake and jet each fastened to gunwales via c-clamp, ie not installed anymore than an outboard. asymmetrical, sure, but so is paddling. steer with paddle, fixed jet...
     
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